215
215
A LARGE AND RARE CARVED 'YAOZHOU' BOWL NORTHERN SONG / JIN DYNASTY
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT
215
A LARGE AND RARE CARVED 'YAOZHOU' BOWL NORTHERN SONG / JIN DYNASTY
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
New York

A LARGE AND RARE CARVED 'YAOZHOU' BOWL NORTHERN SONG / JIN DYNASTY
the deep rounded sides rising from a short tapered foot to a straight lipped rim, freely carved to the interior with stylized lotus amidst a combed ground, the exterior with a broad band of four-petaled florets above a border of lappet motifs at the foot, covered overall with a lustrous olive-green glaze, pooling to a dark green in the recesses, a ring to the interior and the foot ring unglazed, Japanese wood box (3) 
Diameter 8 1/2  in., 21.6 cm
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Provenance

Japanese Private Collection, acquired in the 1960s. 

Catalogue Note

Extremely rare for its large size, this bowl is a masterpiece of the Yaozhou kilns. The slightly waisted silhouette, which endows it with a sense of elegance, is carved with a lively floral design. The restrained strokes complement the subtle curves of the form while adding a sense of overall space and vitality. Bowls of this type were created to be used in conjunction with a ewer, whereby warm water was poured into the bowl to keep the contents of the ewer hot; see a closely related bowl with its ewer in the Palace Museum, Beijing, published in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum. Porcelain of the Song Dynasty (I), Hong Kong, 1996, pl. 102, together with a slightly smaller bowl, pl. 103.

Another bowl of this type, in the Tokyo National Museum, Tokyo, was included in the exhibition The Masterpieces of Yaozhou Ware, Osaka Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, 1997, cat. no. 96. See also a kiln waster consisting of a similar bowl with remains of a second, smaller bowl inside it, excavated from the kiln site and illustrated in The Yaozhou Kiln Site of the Song Period, Beijing, 1998, col. pl. 3, fig. 2, together with fragmentary bowls of this form with different incised designs, pls 30 and 31.

The Yaozhou kilns at Huangpu, southwest of Tongchuan city in Shaanxi province, which had gained renown through their pale green vessels with deep, large-scale carving in the Five Dynasties period (907-960), became China’s major suppliers of high-quality celadon wares in the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127). While they turned to producing bowls and dishes with incised or molded designs on a vast scale and repeated many designs identically in large quantities, they also made small numbers of more individually fashioned items. Typically, ‘Yaozhou’ bowls are decorated on the interior only, the design leaving free a plain broad band at the rim. The delicate overall carved motifs give these bowls an exquisite air.

Matching bowls with ewers were popular among the gentry of the Northern Song period and were also made in qingbai. Numerous paintings of the period depict qingbai ewers of this type, being used to serve wine; see for example three ewers and their matching bowls portrayed in the hanging scroll Literary Gathering, attributed to the Huizong emperor (r. 1101-1125), in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, illustrated in the catalogue to the Museum’s exhibition Precious as the Morning Star, Taipei, 2016, p. 41. 

Important Chinese Art

|
New York