103
103

PROPERTY FROM THE JUNKUNC COLLECTION

A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BRUSHWASHER KANGXI MARK AND PERIOD
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
103

PROPERTY FROM THE JUNKUNC COLLECTION

A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BRUSHWASHER KANGXI MARK AND PERIOD
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
New York

A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BRUSHWASHER KANGXI MARK AND PERIOD
delicately potted of compressed circular form, supported on a shallow tapered foot, the incurved, rounded sides covered with a rich raspberry-red glaze with copper-red flecks, the interior and base left white, the base with a six-character mark in underglaze blue 
Diameter 4 5/8  in., 11.7 cm 
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Provenance

Collection of Stephen Junkunc, III (d. 1978). 

Catalogue Note

Notoriously difficult to achieve due to the temperamental nature of the copper pigment, the attractive 'peachbloom' glaze is only found on a small group of vessels for the scholar's table and is one of the most iconic groups of porcelain created under the Kangxi emperor. Recent research by Peter Lam and other leading scholars indicates that the famous 'peachbloom' group was produced during the early years of the Kangxi period under the supervision of the skilled Zang Yingxuan, who was sent to Jingdezhen in 1681 to oversee the rebuilding of the kilns and serve as imperial supervisor. To manage the fugitive copper-lime pigment, scholars believe that it was sprayed via a long bamboo tube onto a layer of transparent glaze and then fixed with another layer, so that the pigment is suspended within two layers of clear glaze. The spotted green flecking, referred to as pingguo qing 'apple green', is possible through a technique using varied concentrations of copper that, when exposed during firing, oxidize to form green spots and modulation.

Examples of this celebrated type of peachbloom brush washer are represented in many of the world's finest museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Palace Museum, Beijing, and the Sir Percival David Collection at the British Museum, London. A closely related washer with strikingly similar coloration sold in our Hong Kong rooms, 27th April 2003, lot 169; another, formerly in the collection of Emily Trevor, sold at Christie's New York, 19th September 2007, lot 341; a third, formerly in the collection of Edward T. Chow sold at Christie's New York, 19th March 2008, lot 636; another from the Edward T. Chow Collection sold thrice with us, most recently in our Hong Kong rooms, 8th April 2009, lot 1657; and a further example, from the Jie Rui Tang Collection, sold in these rooms, 20th March 2018, lot 318.

Important Chinese Art

|
New York