167
167

PROPERTY OF THE ORIGINAL OWNER

Rolex
A STAINLESS STEEL AUTOMATIC CENTRE SECONDS DIVERS WATCH WITH DATE, GAS ESCAPE VALVE AND BRACELET REF 1665 CASE 4088594 SEA-DWELLER 'DOUBLE RED' CIRCA 1975
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
167

PROPERTY OF THE ORIGINAL OWNER

Rolex
A STAINLESS STEEL AUTOMATIC CENTRE SECONDS DIVERS WATCH WITH DATE, GAS ESCAPE VALVE AND BRACELET REF 1665 CASE 4088594 SEA-DWELLER 'DOUBLE RED' CIRCA 1975
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Timepieces

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London

Rolex
A STAINLESS STEEL AUTOMATIC CENTRE SECONDS DIVERS WATCH WITH DATE, GAS ESCAPE VALVE AND BRACELET REF 1665 CASE 4088594 SEA-DWELLER 'DOUBLE RED' CIRCA 1975
• cal. 1570 automatic movement, 26 jewels, mono-metallic balance • black dial, luminous triangle, baton and dots indexes, aperture for date, luminous hands • stainless steel Oyster case, revolving black bezel calibrated to 60 units, screw-down crown and back, gas escape valve to the band • case, dial and movement signed • with a stainless steel Rolex Oyster bracelet with folding clasp
diameter 38 mm, bracelet circumference approx. 170 mm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

Accompanied by two diver's log books and a diver's Medic Certificate from the original owner. 

The Sea-Dweller was introduced as a tool for divers in 1967 to enhance the Submariner 5513 which was found to be unable to withstand the greater depths of deep sea diving. As divers pushed the limits of technology and pursued greater depths Rolex developed the Sea-Dweller which was fitted with an ingenious one-way pressure relief value, thicker lens and strengthened case.

Having started his diving career when he was 20 years old, the original owner, went on to work for a diving company in the oil industry and it was with his first months’ pay as an offshore diver that he bought his Rolex Sea-Dweller (the present watch). He went on to work in the oil industry for 28 years, working in Norway, Holland, Belgium, India and Italy where they were diving at a depth of 780ft – 238 meters.

During his career he worked on the construction of the Piper Alpha working 12 hour shifts, 33 days at a time. The years of diving under gruelling conditions took its toll, he had the bends and decompression sickness many times and was in constant joint pain and even lost his long term and short term memory. He said, ‘I’ve lost count of the times I should have been dead, I’ve had many large objects land on top of me if it was not for the sea bed being soft pushing me into it’.

His last dive when he was 45 was to go inside the wreckage of the Piper Alpha to switch off a valve to shut down the old oil pipeline, on leaving the diving bell the other divers told him not to get tangled or trapped as they would not come to rescue him.

Fine Timepieces

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London