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Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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New York

A VERY FINE AND RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED RED-PAINTED SPLAYED-LEG OAK JOINT STOOL, PLYMOUTH COLONY, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1680
Height 22 1/8 in. by Width 18 3/8 in. by Depth 12 1/4 in.; 56.2 by 46.7 by 31.1 cm.
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Provenance

Joe Kindig Jr. & Son, York, Pennsylvania, 1975;
Vogel Collection no. 130.

Catalogue Note

Very few joined oak stools survive and even fewer with the their full height feet intact.  The stool’s legs with an inverted baluster turning above a cylindrical turning relate directly to a stool in the collection of the Scituate Historical Society that has been attributed to Scituate by Robert Blair St. George in The Wrought Covenant: Source Material for the Study of Craftsmen and Community in Southeastern New England, 1620-1700, (Brockton, MA: Brockton Art Center-Fuller Memorial, 1979), no. 28,  p. 42. St. George illustrates another stool with heavier turnings that descended in the Fogg family of Scituate. Another closely related stool attributed to Duxbury, Massachusetts is in the collection of the Museum Fine Arts, Boston (acc. no. 1994.61) (St. George, p. 47, no. 40).  It has sets of parallel gouge marks at the lowermost edge of each seat rail that correlates to the same treatment found on the moldings of Plymouth Colony chests. In brief, this turning can be broadly attributed to the Plymouth Colony and subtle variations were employed by various turners in different towns within the colony.  For additional information on related stools and their manufacture see Jennie Alexander and Peter Follansbee, Make a Joint Stool from a Tree: An Introduction to 17th-Century Joinery, (Fort Mitchell, KY: Lost Art Press LLC, 2012).

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York