710
710
A RARE ENGLISH DELFTWARE BLUE AND WHITE SMALL MUG OR CAUDLE CUP
CIRCA 1655-60
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
710
A RARE ENGLISH DELFTWARE BLUE AND WHITE SMALL MUG OR CAUDLE CUP
CIRCA 1655-60
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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New York

A RARE ENGLISH DELFTWARE BLUE AND WHITE SMALL MUG OR CAUDLE CUP
CIRCA 1655-60
probably Southwark, inscribed around the exterior '.NO.MONY.NO.CVNY' within a scalloped-edged label, the center of the interior painted with a rabbit on a grassy mound.
height 2 7/8 in.
7.2 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Jonathan Horne, London, September, 2001, bearing label
Vogel Collection no. 692

Literature

Jonathan Horne, English Pottery and related works of art, 2001, p. 10, no. 01/6

Catalogue Note

Caudle, like posset, was a warm alcoholic drink made with heated wine or ale and various spices, including cinnamon. Popular in the second half of the seventeenth century, caudle was probably drunk in modest quantities as suggested by the rather small size of the bulbous cups from which it was drunk.

An inscribed and dated caudle cup painted with the arms of the Worshipful company of Bakers is similarly decorated with a rabbit in the interior. That example was formerly in the Longridge Collection and is illustrated by Leslie B. Grigsby, The Longridge Collection of English Slipware and Delftware, London, 2000, Vol. 2, p. 265, cat. no. D238, where the author discusses the lewd and suggestive connotation of the rabbit and the inscription 'DRINKE.VP.YOVR.DRI/NKE&SEE.MY.CONNY'. The date is partially obscured but could be read as 165[7]. Grigsby further indicates that the latter portion of this inscription originates in the Middle Ages and “like the rabbit inside it, refers indelicately to a portion of the female anatomy.”

Another caudle cup of this type inscribed and dated 'NO:MONEY:NO:CONNY.1657' is in the Victoria and Albert Museum, illustrated by Louis L. Lipski and Michael Archer, Dated English Delftware, Tin-glazed Earthenware 1600-1800, London, 1984 p. 164, cat. no 738, and Michael Archer, Delftware, The Tin-glazed Earthenware of the British Isles, A Catalogue of the Collection in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 1997, pp. 244-45, cat. no. C.6, Archer cites a further example inscribed 'NO MONNY NO CONNY SIR', sold, Christie's, London, December 6th 1982, lot 21. A third cup belonging to this group inscribed 'DRINK VP.YOVR.DRINK.AND.SE.MY.CO[N]E' from the collection of Bertram K. Little and Nina Fletcher Little was sold, Sotheby's, New York, October 21-22, 1994, lot 485.

A Southwark cup inscribed and dated '16/S/ IA/76', painted with a bounding hare to the interior is illustrated by Michael Archer, Delftware in the Fitzwilliam Museum, London, 2013, p. 168, C.16, where the author notes at least seven other cups with this feature, including those cited above.

Lipski and Archer, ibid, illustrate various examples of the same form dated from 1650 to 1688, pp. 162-177, cat. nos. 730-795, noting this period as the most prolific for the production of the caudle cup form.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York