1061
1061
THE IMPORTANT COOKE-SOUTHWORTH FAMILY WILLIAM AND MARY MAPLE GATE-LEG TABLE, NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1720
Estimate
40,00060,000
JUMP TO LOT
1061
THE IMPORTANT COOKE-SOUTHWORTH FAMILY WILLIAM AND MARY MAPLE GATE-LEG TABLE, NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1720
Estimate
40,00060,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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New York

THE IMPORTANT COOKE-SOUTHWORTH FAMILY WILLIAM AND MARY MAPLE GATE-LEG TABLE, NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1720
appears to retain its original surface; with original long drawer and eight drop turned feet.
Height 27 7/8 in. by Width 21 3/8 in. by Depth 48 1/2 in. (closed); 70.8 by 54.3 by 123.2 cm.
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Provenance

John Cooke (1685-1754) and his wife, Alice Southworth (1688-1770), who married on May 25, 1709, of Little Compton, Rhode Island;
To their son Samuel (1715-1767), who married Patience Cory (1711-1789), of Little Compton;
To their son, Colonel John Cooke (1745-1812), who married Sarah Gray (b. 1743), of Little Compton;
To their daughter, Priscilla (1782-1815), who married Perry Green Arnold (1772-1819), of Little Compton;
To their daughter Sarah (1799-1883), who married Dr. Daniel Watson (1801-1871), of Newport, Rhode Island;
Thence by descent to Mrs. Joseph Hoffman, of Philadelphia;
Samaha Antiques, Milan, Ohio, September 1969;
Vogel Collection no. 54.1.

Literature

The Philadelphia Sunday Bulletin, November 20, 1966;
Erik K. Gronning and Dennis Carr, "Rhode Island Gateleg Tables," Magazine Antiques, May 2004, pp. 125-126, fig. 3;
Erik K. Gronning and Dennis Andrew Carr, "Early Rhode Island Turning," American Furniture 2005, edited by Luke Beckerdite, (Chipstone Foundation by University Press of New England, Milwaukee) 2005, pp. 7-8, 10, figs. 13 and 20;
Patricia E. Kane et al., Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), pp. 31n54, 183n1, 3.
Rhode Island Furniture Archive number RIF5064.

Catalogue Note

Retaining its original surface and drawer, this maple gateleg table has a long history of descent in the Cooke family of Little Compton, Rhode Island and was likely originally owned by John Cooke (1685-1754) and his wife Alice Southworth (1688-1770), who married on May 25, 1709. Alice was the great-great granddaughter of John Alden (c. 1598-1687) who was among the English Puritans or Pilgrims that arrived in the New World on the Mayflower in 1620 and established the Plymouth Colony. She was the daughter of Captain William Southworth (1659-1719), a ship’s captain, mariner and landowner of Little Compton, and his wife Rebecca Pabodie (1660-1702). This table descended directly from John and Alice Cooke through multiple generations of their family until a descendant sold it in 1969.

This table was included in the important study of Rhode Island gateleg tables conducted by Erik Gronning and Dennis Carr and published as “Early Rhode Island Turning” in American Furniture 2005, edited by Luke Beckerdite and published by the Chipstone Foundation. The gateleg tables in the study have turning designs inspired by architectural prototypes from contemporary Newport houses and collectively represent the work of a core group of craftsmen in Newport and surrounding towns. These craftsmen influenced other regional artisans, who incorporated elements of these turning designs into later furniture forms. This resulted in a school of turning in Rhode Island that was cohesive and persisted.

Gronning and Carr categorize the tables in their study into three groups, based on turning sequences and construction. This one is part of group 1, which consists of eight examples with complex turnings comprised of leg balusters with spherical bases with abrupt transitions to tall slender necks and two ring turnings at the top. The tables in the group exhibit construction that is consistent, with drawers supported on runners attached to the side rails, drawer fronts secured at each side with a single large dovetail, top boards pinned to the side rails, and gates that pivot from the same end of the table. These tables have hinges that do not extend under the sides of the frame, which eliminated the need to notch the side rails.  For additional information on Rhode Island gateleg table see Erik Gronning and Dennis Carr, “Early Rhode Island Turning,” American Furniture 2005, ed. Luke Beckerdite. (Milwaukee, WI: The Chipstone Foundation, 2005), pp. 2-21 and Dennis Carr, “Early Furniture Making of the Narragansett Bay Region, 1636-1740,” Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650-1830, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), pp. 9-33, 182-3.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York