1037
1037
AN IMPORTANT PILGRIM CENTURY RED-PAINTED CARVED OAK AND PINE DOCUMENT BOX, SERRATE FOLIATE GROUP, ATTRIBUTED TO THE STOUGHTON SHOP TRADITION, PROBABLY BY THOMAS STOUGHTON IV (1662-1748), WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT, CIRCA 1680
Estimate
50,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 118,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
1037
AN IMPORTANT PILGRIM CENTURY RED-PAINTED CARVED OAK AND PINE DOCUMENT BOX, SERRATE FOLIATE GROUP, ATTRIBUTED TO THE STOUGHTON SHOP TRADITION, PROBABLY BY THOMAS STOUGHTON IV (1662-1748), WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT, CIRCA 1680
Estimate
50,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 118,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York

AN IMPORTANT PILGRIM CENTURY RED-PAINTED CARVED OAK AND PINE DOCUMENT BOX, SERRATE FOLIATE GROUP, ATTRIBUTED TO THE STOUGHTON SHOP TRADITION, PROBABLY BY THOMAS STOUGHTON IV (1662-1748), WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT, CIRCA 1680
appears to retain its original red paint and wrought iron gimmal hinges, lock, and key; (2 pieces).
Height 7 3/8 in. by Width 26 3/8 in. by Depth 17 1/4 in.: 18.7 by 67 by 43.8 cm.
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Provenance

Dr. George L. Compton, Independence, Indiana, August 1997;
Vogel Collection no. 624.

Exhibited

The Woodworkers of Windsor: A Connecticut Community of Craftsmen and Their Work, 1635-1715, April 25-August 18, 2003, Historic Deerfield, Inc., Deerfield, Massachusetts.

Literature

Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, The Woodworkers of Windsor: A Connecticut Community of Craftsmen and Their Work, 1635-1715, (Deerfield, Massachusetts: Historic Deerfield, Inc., 2003), p. 64, no. 26.

Catalogue Note

The maker of this remarkable box, with its beautifully executed flower carving and gouge work, was unknown until the groundbreaking research of Joshua Lane and Donald White who conclusively proved that the maker was Thomas Stoughton IV (1662-1748).  Stoughton was a descendant of Reverend Thomas Stoughton (1557-1612) of County Suffolk, England. His grandfather, Thomas Stoughton, Jr. (1591-1661), immigrated to Dorchester, Massachusetts about 1632 and then received a land grant in Windsor of over 150 acres.  His son Thomas Stoughton III (1657-1712) became a prominent woodworker in Windsor, which his son Thomas Stoughton IV followed.

This box is all the more extraordinary for remaining in such pristine condition.  The red paint appears to be original and the carving has experienced little wear from the ravages of time.  As such, the punch and gouge decorations on the corners of the box remain crisp and visible. The box’s top is made from one large piece of yellow pine and, as the saw kerfs evident on its corners indicate, its raised field was formed using a simple hand saw. The box even retains its original lock and key.

The carving relates quite closely to that found on the front panels of two joined chests. One in the collection of the Henry Ford Museum (acc. no. 36.250.1) and the other in the George Dudley Seymour collection (acc. no. 1945.1.1170) at the Connecticut Historical Society-see Robert Bishop, American Furniture: 1620-1720, (Dearborn, MI: Edison Institute, 1975, p. 12 and George Dudley Seymour's Furniture Collection in the Connecticut Historical Society, (Hartford, CT: Connecticut Historical Society, 1958), no. 20).  Another related box was once in the collection of the Connecticut Historical Society and was once part of the George Dudley Seymour collection (George Dudley Seymour Furniture Collection in the Connecticut Historical Society, (Hartford, CT: Connecticut Historical Society, 1958), no. 6).  For additional information on the Stoughton shop tradition see Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, “Fashioning Furniture and Framing Community: Woodworkers and the Rise of a Connecticut River Valley Town,” American Furniture 2005, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 2005), pp. 146-238 and Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, The Woodworkers of Windsor: A Connecticut Community of Craftsmen and Their Work, 1635-1715, (Deerfield, Massachusetts: Historic Deerfield, Inc., 2003), pp. 57-68.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York