11
11
Amrita Sher-Gil
UNTITLED
Estimate
15,00,00025,00,000
LOT SOLD. 52,50,000 INR
JUMP TO LOT
11
Amrita Sher-Gil
UNTITLED
Estimate
15,00,00025,00,000
LOT SOLD. 52,50,000 INR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Boundless: India

|
Mumbai

Amrita Sher-Gil
1913 - 1941
UNTITLED
This lot is a National Art Treasure under Indian Law and is subject to restrictions, including those applicable under the Antiquities and Art Treasures Act, 1972. This lot may not be exported outside of India by any person other than the Indian Central Government or any authority or agency authorized by the Indian Central Government.
Inscribed 'BRING TO ME DILAH THE REJECTED ONE' lower centre and further signed, inscribed and dated 'Amrita Rajzotta / 10 Loes horambom / Simla, India, 1923, Aprilles' indistinctly on reverse
Watercolour and pencil on paper
5 ½ x 6 ½ in. (13.9 x 16.5 cm.)
Painted in 1923
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Provenance

Collection of the artist
Thence by descent to a member of the artist's family
Acquired from the above by the current owner circa 2000s

Catalogue Note

This delicately rendered watercolour was painted by Sher-Gil when she was only ten years old. From an early age Sher-Gil had shown and aptitude for drawing. “It seems to me that I never began painting that I have always painted. And I have always had, with a strange certitude, the conviction that I was meant to be a painter and nothing else.” (Y. Dalmia, Amrita Sher-Gil, Art & Life, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2014, p. 3)

Around the time this watercolour was painted the family had settled in Simla having been in Hungary for almost ten years. During their return trip to India they stopped off in Paris where they admired the masterworks in the Louvre. Once in Simla, Sher-Gil began to take art lessons with the artist Hal Bevan Petman, formerly of the Slade School of Art London. Petman placed an emphasis on drawing and form, that he believed was the basis of all art. Petman sooned realised Sher-Gil was very talented, 'he came to believe that his young pupil was a rather unusual and remarkable person who had it in her to become a real artist if given the requisite freedom.' (Y. Dalmia, Amrita Sher-Gil: A Life, Penguin Books, New Delhi, 2006, p. 18)

Boundless: India

|
Mumbai