325
325

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, USA

A Fabergé jewelled gold, turquoise and hardstone study of forget-me-nots, circa 1910
JUMP TO LOT
325

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, USA

A Fabergé jewelled gold, turquoise and hardstone study of forget-me-nots, circa 1910
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé & Icons

|
London

A Fabergé jewelled gold, turquoise and hardstone study of forget-me-nots, circa 1910
the petals prong-set with turquoise beads centring circular-cut topaz or citrine fornices, carved nephrite leaves, the cut sprig in a carved rock crystal pot with flared rim, apparently unmarked, in a leather A La Vieille Russie case
height 18cm, 7 1/8 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Purchased from A La Vieille Russie, New York, by the parents of the current owners

Catalogue Note

The present lot is the first Fabergé study of forget-me-nots to come to public auction in fifteen years and possibly the largest in decades.  In its exuberance and profusion of branches and flowerheads, its nearest relation is the example from The de Vere Clifton Collection, illustrated by Bainbridge (Peter Carl Fabergé: His Life and Work, London, 1949, pl. 37), also with five nephrite leaves and also unmarked.  Other studies of forget-me-nots are usually set with diamond fornices, but the use of faceted yellow stones on the present lot is in fact closer to nature; their use was employed on another forget-me-not, illustrated, M. Sweezey, et al., Fabergé Flowers, New York, 2004, p. 104.  For slight variants of this form of the rock crystal pot, please see the examples in the British Royal Collection, including the pansy (RCIN 40505) and raspberry (RCIN 40251), illustrated, C. de Guitaut, Fabergé in the Royal Collection, London, 2003, pp. 106, 111.

In the language of flowers, the forget-me-not is especially rich in meaning and associations.  A lasting symbol of remembrance, faithfulness and undying love, its descriptive name was first coined by the Germans, and its earliest myths originated in Germany and surrounding countries.  One recounts the story of two lovers walking along the Danube River.  Seeing the bright blue blossoms along the bank, the man retrieved the flowers and gave them to the lady, just as he was swept away by the river, begging her not to forget him as he perished.  Another German legend holds that God had finished naming all the plants when a tiny as-yet-unnamed one cried out, ‘Forget me not, O Lord!’ to which God replied, ‘That shall be your name’.

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé & Icons

|
London