64
64

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, ENGLAND

Konstantin Fedorovich Yuon
A BEAUTIFUL DAY, IZMAILOVO
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 320,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
64

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, ENGLAND

Konstantin Fedorovich Yuon
A BEAUTIFUL DAY, IZMAILOVO
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 320,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Pictures

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Konstantin Fedorovich Yuon
1875-1958
A BEAUTIFUL DAY, IZMAILOVO
signed in Cyrillic l.r.
oil on canvas
65 by 100cm, 25 1/2 by 39 1/2 in.

Executed in 1952
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Provenance

A gift from the Soviet government to Richard Austin Butler (1902-1982), April 1956
Thence by descent

Literature

N.Tretyakov, Konstantin Fedorovich Yuon, Moscow: Iskusstvo, 1957, p.121 listed under works from 1952; p.214 illustrated b/w

Catalogue Note

After the Revolution Yuon appeared to embrace new and officially-sanctioned themes, painting large-scale parades on Red Square, portraits of Lenin and heroic Komsomol workers. With its horse-drawn sleigh riding through a snow-covered birch forest, A Beautiful Day, Izmailovo is the artist’s homage to the old, pre-revolutionary Russia, untainted by the industrialisation and urbanisation that followed the events of 1917. This retrospective and nostalgic work harks back to Yuon’s earlier snowy scenes such as March Sun (fig.1) and The End of Winter (fig.2). In this celebration of the brilliance of the Russian winter, one encounters the characteristic sentimentality and optimism that inspired Sergei Gerasimov (1885-1964) to liken Yuon’s late landscapes to ‘a hymn to the beauty of her nature, a marvel of colour, sunshine and light – in them is the joy of life’ (Yuon, Leningrad: Aurora, 1972, p.13).

A Beautiful Day, Izmailovo was gifted by the Soviet government to the British Conservative politician Rab Butler, mostly likely during Khrushchev’s state visit in April 1956. This was barely two months after the first secretary's 'secret speech' which denounced Stalin's purges and marked the beginning of the process of de-Stalinisation. The Soviet delegation came to Britain on warships that docked at Portsmouth spending a total of eight days in the country, including three days of talks at Downing Street and a visit to Chequers. As the Lord Privy Seal and unofficial deputy to the Prime Minister Anthony Eden, Butler played a key role during this important visit.

Russian Pictures

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