121
121

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF JAN KRUGIER

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
JUPITER AND THETIS
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 62,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
121

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF JAN KRUGIER

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
JUPITER AND THETIS
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 62,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master Drawings

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New York

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
MONTAUBAN 1780 - 1867 PARIS
JUPITER AND THETIS
Watercolor heightened with white, over traces of graphite;
signed, lower left: par Ingres
285 by 235 mm; 11¼ by 9¼ in
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Private Collection, France;
sale, Paris, Etude Me Auday, 14 June 1989, lot 12,
purchased at the above sale by the late owner



Literature

A. Dückers, Linie, Licht und Schatten, Meisterzeichnungen und Skulpturen der Sammlung Jan und Marie-Anne Krugier-Poniatowski, Berlin 1999, p. 144, under no. 65

Catalogue Note

This drawing is a highly important compositional study for Ingres’ iconic and monumental painting of Jupiter and Thetis, now in the Musée Granet, Aix-en-Provence (fig. 1), which the artist first conceived at the end of 1806, immediately following his arrival in Rome, but finally dispatched back to France only in 1811.  On its arrival in Paris, Ingres’ painting, with its extraordinary, stylized lighting, sensual yet unnatural anatomy and dramatic composition, caused a huge stir, and seriously unnerved the artist’s former teacher, Jacques-Louis David, who on seeing the picture observed: “I no longer know how to paint.”1

Although the dramatic frontality of the Jupiter and Thetis is in some ways a natural progression from Ingres’ ground-breaking 1806 depiction of Napoleon seated on his Imperial Throne, housed in the Musée de l’Armée, Paris (fig. 2), the dramatic contrast with the attenuated, smooth-skinned figure of Thetis was something entirely new, and the five-year delay in completing the picture clearly indicates how hard Ingres worked in arriving at his final solution.  This creative process is well documented through a series of notes and some fifteen studies in the Musée Ingres, Montauban,2 but of those other drawings, none come close to representing the final composition of the painting as effectively as the present work.  Indeed the function that these other drawings served in the project is very different to that of the present work and whilst the Montauban drawings demonstrate the artist’s focus on specific figures and poses in preparation for the finished painting, our drawing offers the artist’s complete solution for the composition, making it undoubtedly the most complete drawing known to exist for this, now iconic, commission.

Ingres’ use of watercolor in the present work also helps to separate it on a more technical level from the aforementioned drawings at Montauban relating to the Jupiter and Thetis project, all of which are executed in either lead or chalk.  Parallels can instead be drawn between our work and another highly impressive and iconic work on paper, sold in these rooms in 2014,3 depicting Napoleon seated on his Imperial Throne, in which Ingres has also incorporated colored washes to heighten the level of finish in the drawing.

1. See P. Mesplé, ‘David et ses élèves toulousains,’ Archives d’Art Français, vol. XXIV, 1969, p. 99

2. G. Vigne, Dessins d'Ingres. Catalogue raisonné des dessins du Musée de Montauban, Paris, 1995, pp. 20-23, nos. 20-36.

3. Sale, London, Sotheby's, 9 July 2014, lot 97

Old Master Drawings

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New York