58
58

PROPERTY FROM COLSTOUN, EAST LOTHIAN

Three Sikh gilded steel Chakkar Quoits, Punjab, 18th/19th century
Estimate
1,5002,500
LOT SOLD. 32,500 GBP (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
58

PROPERTY FROM COLSTOUN, EAST LOTHIAN

Three Sikh gilded steel Chakkar Quoits, Punjab, 18th/19th century
Estimate
1,5002,500
LOT SOLD. 32,500 GBP (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Of Royal and Noble Descent

|
London

Three Sikh gilded steel Chakkar Quoits, Punjab, 18th/19th century
with sharpened edges and in three sizes, mounted in a later glazed and ebonised velvet lined wall cabinet
each diameter; 23cm., 19.5cm., 19cm.; 9in., 7 3/4 in., 7 1/2 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Acquired by or presented to James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, Marquess of Dalhousie (1812-1860) for his collection of arms and armour

Catalogue Note

In Sir William Thorn's (1781–1843) A Memoir of the late War in India (1818), the soldier and military historian describes the terrifying impact Chakkar Quoits had on cavalrymen. He writes, 'besides the matchlock, spear, the scimitar, which are all excellent in their kinds, some of the Seiks [sic] are armed with a very singular weapon, which they use with great and destructive effect against cavalry. It consists of a hollow circle, made of finely tempered steel, with an exceedingly sharp edge, about a foot in diameter, and an inch in breadth on the inner side. This instrument the horseman poises on his fore-finger, and after giving it two or three swift motions, to accelerate its velocity, sends it from him to the distance of some hundreds of yards, the ring cutting and maiming, most dreadfully, every living object that may chance to be in its way’. It is likely the present Quoits were presented as trophies following the successful conclusion of the Second Sikh War (1848-1849).

Of Royal and Noble Descent

|
London