57
57
(Hemingway, Ernest)
A PAIR OF BULL’S HORNS MOUNTED IN BRASS, GIVEN TO HEMINGWAY BY ANTONIO ORDÓÑEZ
Estimate
10,00015,000
JUMP TO LOT
57
(Hemingway, Ernest)
A PAIR OF BULL’S HORNS MOUNTED IN BRASS, GIVEN TO HEMINGWAY BY ANTONIO ORDÓÑEZ
Estimate
10,00015,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Maurice Neville Collection of Modern Literature (Part III)

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New York

(Hemingway, Ernest)
A PAIR OF BULL’S HORNS MOUNTED IN BRASS, GIVEN TO HEMINGWAY BY ANTONIO ORDÓÑEZ
One horn inscribed by the bullfighter in red ink "[two illegible words] Ernest Hemingway / My gran amigo / Antonio Ordonez / el torito mas grande del Mondo / Pamplona / 1953," which roughly translates to "Ernest Hemingwa y/ My great friend / Antonio Ordonez / the biggest bull in the world / Pamplona / 1953." Depicted above this in blue ink is a sketch of the bull by Ordóñez. Inscribed on the other horn, in blue ink, is the signature "Picasso" dated 19 November 1953.
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Provenance

The Hemingway Family (Sotheby's New York, 17 May 1984, lot 625) — Sotheby's New York, 14 February 1986, lot 471

Catalogue Note

Antonio Ordoñez was the son of Cayetano Ordoñez, the inspiration behind the character Pedro Romero, in The Sun Also Rises. Hemingway wrote this novel after his mentor, Gertrude Stein, advised him to travel to Pamplona for the Feria de San Fermin in June 1923. While there, Hemingway became enraptured by the aggressive cultural celebrations and the art of la corrida, the Spanish style of bullfighting. He returned to Pamplona two years later, and recognized the physical manifestation of his literary concept “grace under pressure” in Cayetano’s, known as El Niño de la Palma, style of la corrida.  The two became lifelong friends, and while growing up, Antonio even referred to Hemingway as “father Ernesto.”

When Hemingway returned to Pamplona in the spring of 1953, Antonio reignited his passion for bullfighting and the author felt that the son had even surpassed his father.  Soon after, Hemingway and his wife traveled to Africa, by way of Paris and Marseilles, and remained there from the summer of 1953 through the following winter. The recollection of the Hemingway family was that the horns were left with a friend who later joined them in Africa. The supposition is that Picasso, who had known Hemingway for decades, added his signature during this period. 

The Maurice Neville Collection of Modern Literature (Part III)

|
New York