339
339
Henry Moore
ARCHITECTURE PRIZE
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 225,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
339
Henry Moore
ARCHITECTURE PRIZE
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 225,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Henry Moore
1898 - 1986
ARCHITECTURE PRIZE
Inscribed Moore, numbered 9/9 and stamped with the foundry mark Noack Berlin
Bronze
Length (including base): 12 5/8 in.
32 cm
Conceived and cast in 1979 in a numbered edition of 9 plus 1 artist's proof for the Hyatt Foundation, to be used as trophies for the Pritzker Architecture Prize. 
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This work is recorded in the archives of the Henry Moore Foundation.

Provenance

Hyatt Foundation, Chicago
Private Collection, Berlin
Private Collection, France (and sold: Sotheby's, New York, May 7, 2003, lot 347)
Private Collection, London (acquired at the above sale)
Gimpel Fils, London (acquired by 2011)
Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 2014

Exhibited

London, Gimpel Fils, Modern British Sculpture, 2011, n.n.

Literature

David Mitchinson, ed., Henry Moore, Sculpture, With Comments by the Artist, New York, 1981, no. 618, illustrations of the larger version p. 296
Alan Bowness, ed., Henry Moore, The Complete Sculpture, 1974-80, vol. 5, London, 1983, no. 756, illustration of another cast p. 41

Catalogue Note

Known as "architecture's Nobel," the Pritzker Prize was established "to honor a living architect whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision, and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture." From its inception in 1979 until 1987, casts from the edition of nine were presented to Pritzker Laureates, along with a $100,000 grant, at the annual award ceremony. Early honorees who received Moore's sculpture include such luminaries as Philip Johnson (1979), I.M. Pei (1983) and Richard Meier (1984). After nine years, the sculpture was replaced with a bronze medallion based on designs by Chicago architect Louis Sullivan.


It is easy to see why Architecture Prize (taken from Moore's larger-scale version entitled Two Piece Reclining Figure: Cut) was an apt choice to represent the pinnacle of achievement in the field of architecture. Its volumetric arches, distinctive cross section of negative space and tower-like torso all evoke structural creations, unified by Moore's elegizing of form and anchored in the precepts of Modernism.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York