335
335
Henry Moore
TORSO
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 432,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
335
Henry Moore
TORSO
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 432,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Henry Moore
1898 - 1986
TORSO
Inscribed Moore, numbered 7/7 and stamped with the foundry mark H. Noack Berlin 
Bronze
Height (including base): 45 1/2 in.
115.5 cm
Conceived in 1967. According to the Henry Moore Foundation, this work was cast in an edition of 7 and not 9 as stated in the literature. 
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This work is recorded in the archives of the Henry Moore Foundation.

Provenance

Acquired directly from the artist in May 1986 by the present owner

Literature

Henry Moore (exhibition catalogue), Marlborough Gallery, New York, 1970, no. 29, illustration of another cast p. 68
Henry Moore, Sculpture (exhibition catalogue), Galerie Beyeler, Basel, 1970, no. 10, illustration of another cast n.p.
Robert Melville, Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, New York, 1971, no. 723, illustration of another cast p. 315
David Finn, Henry Moore, Sculpture and Environment, 1977, illustration of another cast p. 480
Alan Bowness, Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings, 1964-1973, vol. 4, London, 1977, no. 569, illustration of another cast p. 49
Josep Iglesias del Marquet, Henry Moore y el Inquietante Infinito, Barcelona, 1979, no. 64, illustration of another cast n.p.
David Mitchinson, ed., Henry Moore, Sculpture, New York, 1981, no. 426, illustration of another cast p. 200

Catalogue Note

Torso dates from the height of Moore's career, when he had mastered the most technically complex expressions of this form. The conical protrusions where a head, arms and legs would usually be expected exemplifies Moore’s interest in developing a sculptural language inspired by the shapes of natural materials. Moore himself described the progression of his sculpture as "becoming less representational, less outwardly a visual copy, and so what some people would call more abstract; but only because in this way I can present the human psychological context of my work with the greatest clearness and intensity" (quoted in F.S. Wight, ed., Henry Moore: The Reclining Figure (exhibition catalogue), The Columbus Museum, Columbus, 1984, p. 131).

Moore’s series of Torsos of the mid-1960s underscores his fascination with the human form as well as its anthropomorphic possibilities, here equally evoking the shape of the human figure and the form of a branching tree trunk. As the artist once stated, "Trunks of trees are very human. A branch that comes out from the main trunk is like an arm coming out from a body” (quoted in Alan G. Wilkinson, ed., Henry Moore, Writings and Conversations, Aldershot, 2002, p. 240). The work also shares features with other motifs that Moore explored around this time, including his Three Way compositions, works distinctly intended to be observed from multiple angles, as well as his Compact Forms, dense sculptures evoking recoiled, inward motion.

His series of Torsos also underscore his love for ancient monuments and in particular his lifelong admiration for Stonehenge, if not in shape then in scale. Since his childhood Moore had been fascinated by the ancient ruin and remembered his visit in the early 1920s to the site of the primeval monoliths in Salisbury as follows: "As it was a clear evening I got to Stonehenge and saw it by moonlight. I was alone and tremendously impressed. (Moonlight, as you know, enlarges everything, and the mysterious depths and distances made it seem enormous.) I went again the next morning, it was still very impressive, but that first moonlight visit remained for years my idea of Stonehenge" (quoted in David Sylvester, ed., Henry Moore Sculpture and Drawings, 1921-48, London, 1957, p. 3).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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