194
194

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
PORTRAIT DE STÉPHANE MALLARMÉ
Estimate
400,000600,000
JUMP TO LOT
194

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
PORTRAIT DE STÉPHANE MALLARMÉ
Estimate
400,000600,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
1841-1919
PORTRAIT DE STÉPHANE MALLARMÉ
Signed Renoir. (upper right)
Oil on canvas
10 5/8 by 8 1/2 in.
27 by 21.5 cm
Painted in 1892.
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This work will be included in the catalogue critique being prepared by the Wildenstein Institute from the François Daulte, Durand-Ruel, Venturi, Vollard and Wildenstein archives.

Provenance

Sacha Guitry, Paris (acquired by 1953)
Private Collection (and sold: Sotheby's, London, June 28, 1995, lot 133)
Acquired at the above sale

Literature

Sacha Guitry, Cent merveilles choisies par Sacha Guitry, Paris, 1954, illustrated n.p. 
Alain Decaux, Sacha Guitry, Cinquante ans d'occupation, Paris, 1993, illustrated p. 114
Jean Pierre Bouyxou, "La Guitrymania submerge Paris" in Paris Match, November 25, 1993, illustrated in a photograph of Sacha Guitry in his home
Guy Patrice & Michel Dauberville, Renoir, Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles, vol. II, Paris, 2009, no. 1256, illustrated p. 355

Catalogue Note

Famed for his salons and revolutionary Symbolist poetry, Stéphane Mallarmé is depicted serenely and contemplatively by his friend and frequent salon guest, Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Mallarmé’s Symbolist writing and fin de siècle style anticipated fusions between poetry and other art forms, and he is credited for inspiring Cubism, Futurism, Dadaism and Surrealism. Critic Barbara Johnson explains Mallarmé’s significant influence on art in multiple media: “It was largely by learning the lesson of Mallarmé that critics like Roland Barthes came to speak of 'the death of the author' in the making of literature. Rather than seeing the text as the emanation of an individual author's intentions, structuralists and deconstructors followed the paths and patterns of the linguistic signifier, paying new attention to syntax, spacing, intertextuality, sound, semantics, etymology, and even individual letters” (Barbara Johnson, "Translator's Note to Stéphane Mallarmé" in Divagations, Cambridge, 2007, p. 301).

As Mallarmé experimented with language and emphasized form over content for his work, his contemporaries who were painters, who frequented his weekly salons, similarly dismissed the academic styles of their predecessors in favor of using their medium with greater expressiveness, as well represented in the present work. Renoir’s vigorous brushwork for this portrait is remarkable and effectively evokes the likeness of the sitter. Another 1892 portrait of Mallarmé by Renoir, for which the present work may have been the preparatory painting, currently hangs in the Château de Versailles.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York