565
565

PROPERTY FROM THE JEFFREY M. KAPLAN COLLECTION

A GOLD AND SILVER-INLAID BRONZE TAPIR-FORM VESSEL (ZUN)
MING DYNASTY, 16TH / 17TH CENTURY
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 492,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
565

PROPERTY FROM THE JEFFREY M. KAPLAN COLLECTION

A GOLD AND SILVER-INLAID BRONZE TAPIR-FORM VESSEL (ZUN)
MING DYNASTY, 16TH / 17TH CENTURY
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 492,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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New York

A GOLD AND SILVER-INLAID BRONZE TAPIR-FORM VESSEL (ZUN)
MING DYNASTY, 16TH / 17TH CENTURY
finely cast after the archaic bronze wine vessel, the beast standing four square with head raised and ears pricked, the mouth slightly open and pierced below a curled snout, bearing a collar encircling the neck, the sides and haunches cast with scrolls and swirling patterns in low relief, with the long tapered tail swept to the side below a hinged circular cover, profusely decorated all over with archaistic motifs in silver inlay and gilt, the bronze with an enhanced greenish-brown patina with patches of malachite-green encrustation
Length 11 1/2  in., 29.2 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sydney L. Moss, London, 2000. 

Exhibited

Escape from the Dusty World, Sydney L. Moss, London, 1999, cat. no. 113. 

Catalogue Note

The shape and inlaid decoration of this vessel are based on ancient prototypes from the Warring States period, 5th-3rd century B.C., such as one example in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, illustrated in Special Exhibition of Shang and Chou Dynasty Bronze Wine vessels, National Palace Museum, Taipei, 1989, cat. no. 66.

Later archaistic vessels of this form have historically been dated broadly to the Song to Ming dynasties, with a number attributed to the Yuan dynasty, such as one included in the exhibition Through the Prism of the Past. Antiquarian Trends in Chinese Art of the 16th to 18th Century, National Palace Museum, Taipei, 2008, cat. no. III-55. A slightly smaller vessel, similarly cast and inlaid is illustrated in Philip K. Hu, Later Chinese Bronzes. The Saint Louis Museum and Robert E. Kresko Collections, Saint Louis, 2008, pl. 6, where the author notes that the addition of low and medium cast relief patterns suggests a Ming dynasty manufacture. See also another similar example, acquired by Henri Cernuschi in 1896, attributed to the 16th to early 17th century, in the exhibition Bronzes de la Chine impériale des Song aux Qing, Musée Cernuschi, Paris, 2013, cat. no. 42.

Important Chinese Art

|
New York