262
262
Gem set, enamel and diamond pendant, 1850s
Estimate
25,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
262
Gem set, enamel and diamond pendant, 1850s
Estimate
25,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Jewels

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London

Gem set, enamel and diamond pendant, 1850s
Modelled as a cross, set with cabochon emeralds and rubies and rose diamonds, to a central square emerald and circular-cut diamond surround, with red guilloché and blue enamel ground, length approximately 101 x 59 x 10mm, French assay and maker's marks, fitted case inscribed 'Croix Ciselée vers 1725 avant fait partie du tresor des Romanoff offerte in 1850 par le Tsar Nicolas 1ER a Madame Arnould-Plessy Collection de Monsieur Foulon de Vaux'.
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Provenance

Presented by Tsar Nicholas I to the celebrated French actress Madame Arnould-Plessy in 1850; The collection of Monsieur Foulon de Vaux; 2005, 11th June, Finan & Co, Fine Art Consultants Auctioneers and Valuers, Catalogue of Antiques & Works of Art, The Old Ship Hotel Mere, lot 8, £12,200.00.

Literature

Accompanied by a copy of the original auction catalogue: 2005, 11th June, Finan & Co, Fine Art Consultants Auctioneers and Valuers, Catalogue of Antiques & Works of Art, The Old Ship Hotel Mere.

Catalogue Note

Jeanne Sylvanie Arnould-Plessy was born in Metz, France, the daughter of a local actor named Plessy, and became a pupil of Samson at the Conservatoire in 1829. She made her stage debut as Emma at the Comédie-Française in 1834 in Alexandre Duval's La Fille d'honneur to great acclaim. Until 1845 she had prominent parts in all the plays, new and old, at the Théâtre Français, when suddenly at the height of her success, she left Paris and went to London to marry the dramatic author, J. F. Arnould, a man much older than herself. The Comédie-Française, after having tried in vain to bring her back, brought a suit against her and obtained damages.

 Madame Arnould-Plessy later accepted an engagement at the French theatre at St. Petersburg (Mikhaylovsky Theatre), where she played for nine years and was greatly appreciated by Tsar Nicholas I and the Russian aristocracy. In 1855, she returned to Paris and was re-admitted to the Comédie-Française, as pensionnaire in an engagement for eight years. This second part of her career was even more brilliant than the first, where she was to revive  some of her earlier roles. Her later triumphs were especially associated with new plays by Emile Augier, including Maître Guérin, while her last appearance was in Édouard Cadol's La Grand-maman;finally retiring in 1876.

 

Fine Jewels

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London