32
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PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, SÃO PAULO

José Gallegos y Arnosa
ALL SOULS' DAY IN ROME 
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
32

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, SÃO PAULO

José Gallegos y Arnosa
ALL SOULS' DAY IN ROME 
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

European Art

|
New York

José Gallegos y Arnosa
1859 - 1917
ALL SOULS' DAY IN ROME 
signed JGallegos (lower right)
oil on canvas
20 1/4 by 33 5/8 in.
51.4 by 85.4 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Acquired by the present owner in 2014 

Exhibited

Dublin, Irish International Exhibition, 1907, no. 354 (lent by the artist)

Literature

Irish International Exhibition, Dublin, 1907: Fine Art Section, British and Foreign Artists, Dublin, 1907, p. 39

Catalogue Note

The paintings of José Gallegos y Arnosa are distinguished by their nuanced attention to color and texture, emphasizing the tactility of the subject rather than their emotional sway or narrative. This can be seen in the present work, All Souls’ Day in Rome, where the focus of his brush is on the beautifully patterned textiles of the flower sellers’ and their brilliantly colored chrysanthemums, which overwhelm the composition. Flowering in late October, chrysanthemums became an integral and deeply symbolic part of the ritual and remembrance of family and friends on November 2nd, All Souls' Day.

Originally from Jerez de la Frontera in the Andalusian region of Cadiz, Gallegos pursued his art education in Madrid in 1873, and travelled to North Africa soon after, attracted by the light and interesting subjects, as seen in one of his best known canvases, Arab Wedding (1878, Prado, Madrid). By 1880 he made his home in Rome, where he found great commercial success alongside other Spanish-born artists, including Juan Pablo Salinas, José Benlliure y Gil and Salvador Sánchez Barbudo. The artist's international fame was secured in part through participation in the great World’s Fairs of his era.  All Souls’ Day in Rome was submitted to the 1907 Irish International Exhibition where nearly three million visitors walked through its fifty-two acres of automobile, electric and gas lighting displays, enjoyed funfair amusements, and viewed the wide ranging submissions to its fine art pavilions. Since its record in the exhibition’s guidebook, the present work has been untraced for over a century emerging only recently to afford a renewed appreciation of Gallegos’ oeuvre.

European Art

|
New York