3066
3066
DIDACTIC FLOWERS
LATE 19TH CENTURY, PROBABLY BY ROBERT BRENDEL (1821-98) OR REINHOLD BRENDEL (1861-1927)
Estimate
40,00060,000
JUMP TO LOT
3066
DIDACTIC FLOWERS
LATE 19TH CENTURY, PROBABLY BY ROBERT BRENDEL (1821-98) OR REINHOLD BRENDEL (1861-1927)
Estimate
40,00060,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Curiosity III

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Hong Kong

DIDACTIC FLOWERS
LATE 19TH CENTURY, PROBABLY BY ROBERT BRENDEL (1821-98) OR REINHOLD BRENDEL (1861-1927)
the three hand-painted papier mâché sculptures each raised on rotatable wood stands, one depicting a male fern sporangium, with the striated annulus supported on a stalk and enclosing numerous brown spores, beside a single model of a spore; the second model depicting the sclerotium of an ergot fungus, issuing five stalks of red or pink sphaeridia in various lengths; the third a spikelet of rye, the petal-form lemma enclosing a pair of egg-shaped florets each issuing two long stems
the largest 39.8 cm, 15 5/8  in.
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Catalogue Note

The present models belong to a group of botanical sculptures depicting microscopic floral structures produced in the late 19th century. Such sculptures were often made of papier mâché, sometimes including other materials such as wood, cotton, rattan, pulp cane, glass beads, feathers and gelatine to convey different textures. They were probably produced by Robert Brendel and his son, Reinhold, who were active at Breslau and Berlin. 

In the 19th century, there was a great demand for these didactic models of plants in universities worldwide. Owing to their accurate representations of the scientific structures, they were widely used as aids to teaching. Some of these were acquired from Alberto Dall'Eco, a Florentine dealer in scientific educational materials during the late 19th to the early 20th centuries.

A number of similar specimens is still extant in the Department of Biology at the University of Florence and University of Aberdeen Zoology Museum.

Curiosity III

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Hong Kong