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PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

A George I giltwood marginal plated pier mirror, circa 1725, in the manner of Gumley and Moore
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70

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

A George I giltwood marginal plated pier mirror, circa 1725, in the manner of Gumley and Moore
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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A George I giltwood marginal plated pier mirror, circa 1725, in the manner of Gumley and Moore
the rectangular and marginal plates within an architectural and foliate carved frame, with a swan-neck cresting centred by a wheat-sheaf, with brass candle-arms
153.5cm high, 84cm. wide; 5ft. ½in., 2ft. 9in.
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Catalogue Note

Of tabernacle form, this superb mirror evinces the emerging neo-Palladian style popularised by such architects as William Kent (c. 1685–1748) and James Gibbs (1682–1754). Whereas most tabernacle mirrors of the period had a central plate within a carved - often giltwood - frame, the present mirror is unusual in that its extensively plated. It therefore required both a highly skilled carver and glass maker, resulting in an item of the utmost luxury. 

The design of the mirror shares characteristics with the output of James Moore and his partner John Gumley, ‘cabinet-maker and glass-seller to the crown’ from 1717 to 1726. The 'Indian Masks' which adorn the present mirror feature on several tables by or attributed to Moore, who was in turn influenced by Continental ornemanistes such as Le Pautre. These include one in the collection of the Dukes of Devonshire at Chatsworth and another sold Sotheby’s, The Contents of Benacre Hall, Suffolk, 9-11 May 2000, lot 34. For a related giltwood mirror, thought to be the earliest known example of an English tabernacle mirror, supplied to Streatlam Castle, Co. Durham, see Adam Bowett, Early Georgian Furniture 1715-1740, China, 2009, p. 295, pl. 6:57. 

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