120
120
Daniel Ridgway Knight
AMERICAN
A HALT 
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 62,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
120
Daniel Ridgway Knight
AMERICAN
A HALT 
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 62,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Art Treasures of America: The John F. Eulich Collection

|
New York

Daniel Ridgway Knight
1839-1924
AMERICAN
A HALT 
signed D. Ridgway Knight, inscribed Paris, and dated 1890 (lower left) 
oil on canvas
45 by 58 in.
114.3 by 147.3 cm
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Howard L. Rehs has authenticated this work from a photograph and will include it in his forthcoming catalogue raisonné to be published by Rehs Galleries, Inc.-www.ridgwayknight.com.

Provenance

An English Family, 1911
Private Collection (by descent from the above and sold, Sotheby's, New York, April 18, 2008, lot 46, illustrated, as Maidens Waiting)
Acquired at the above sale 

Literature

George William Sheldon, Recent Ideals of American Art, New York, 1888-90, illustrated opposite p. 27

Catalogue Note

After Daniel Ridgway Knight’s first artistic successes in Paris, Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissioner invited him to move to Poissy, a rural town not far outside the city limits. The renowned Meissonier was impressed with Ridgway Knight's talent and offered his protégé advice and a challenge: to paint a large picture from a recent sketch.  Ridgway Knight boldly met his mentor's goal, and the resulting painting of 1875, Les Laveuses (sold in these rooms April 25, 2006, lot 142) set him in a new direction, informing a series of ambitious and complex multi-figural compositions, like the present work.

As a proponent of painting en plein air, Ridgway Knight closely studied natural light and his masterful technique can be seen in the present work, where he effectively depicts his scene under the flat overcast sky of late autumn. In A Halt, each detail of the landscape, field workers' costumes, gestures, and their heavy loads of vegetables and house wares are carefully described to suggest how the efforts of "simple" tasks affected the women of Poissy. Ridgway Knight was also influenced by the works of Jean-François Millet and, while painting in Barbizon in 1874, he visited the artist. However, Ridgway Knight was not seduced by Millet’s realist view of rural farm life, choosing instead to depict his peasants in more cheerful circumstances. Such an idealization of the rural laborer followed themes established earlier in the nineteenth century and popularized by Ridgway Knight's contemporaries, such as Jules Breton and even William Bouguereau.

Art Treasures of America: The John F. Eulich Collection

|
New York