102
102
Marie-François Firmin-Girard
FRENCH
WOMAN SEWING IN A GARDEN 
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
102
Marie-François Firmin-Girard
FRENCH
WOMAN SEWING IN A GARDEN 
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Art Treasures of America: The John F. Eulich Collection

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New York

Marie-François Firmin-Girard
1838-1921
FRENCH
WOMAN SEWING IN A GARDEN 
signed FIRMIN-GIRARD. and dated 1875. (lower right)
oil on canvas 
14 by 9 3/8 in.
35.6 by 23.8 cm
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Provenance

Arcadia, Inc., Washington, D.C.
Private Collection
Acquired from the above in 1981 and sold, Sotheby's, New York, May 18, 2016, lot 24, illustrated
Acquired at the above sale 

We are grateful to Mademoiselle Victoire Baron for confirming that this work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist’s work.

Catalogue Note

Marie-François Firmin-Girard drew his inspiration from everyday life, whether it was the bustling flower markets of Paris (as seen in La Quai aux Fleurs, sold in these rooms, May 9, 2014), leisurely riverside restaurants, or an intimate moment in a private garden, as seen in the present work. Firmin-Girard's canvases consistently display an artistic virtuosity that solidified his reputation as one of the premier artists of the Belle Époque. 

Firmin-Girard's keen attention to detail is his trademark; as one critic described "one can count dead leaves on the ground, one can count ladybirds on dead leaves, and one can even give oneself the pleasure of counting the points on the ladybirds backs" (as quoted in Paul Girard, Firmin-Girard par son petit-fils, Orléans, 1998, p. 7). His talent is particularly evident in this small composition, with the artist's subject seated on a painted iron chair, surrounded by geraniums on a verdant garden path. The model wears a fashionable black dress, and the artist uses texture and trim embellishment to break up the dark color; the overskirt has scalloped edging and is trimmed with furbelows, while the underskirt appears to have a velvet stripe pattern on it. Her hair is casually styled under a straw garden hat, decorated with flowers.

Firmin-Girard moved to Paris in the early 1850s to attend the École des Beaux Arts, and by the age of sixteen he was studying in the ateliers of Charles Gleyre and Jean-Léon Gérôme. He made his debut at the Salon in 1859, when three works were accepted by the Jury, and two years later he was the runner up for the Prix de Rome. His Après le bal won a third-class medal in the Salon of 1863 and was purchased by Princess Mathilde, resulting in greater prestige for the artist and many valuable commissions. At the 1874 Salon, Firmin-Girard was awarded a second-class medal and later, in 1896, he was decorated with the Légion d'honneur.

Art Treasures of America: The John F. Eulich Collection

|
New York