1028
Alexander Hamilton
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (“A HAMILTON”) TO ELIZABETH HAMILTON, COMMISERATING OVER HER ILL HEALTH AND CONSIDERING THE PRACTICALITY OF HIS FAMILY TRAVELLING TO JOIN HIM
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
1028
Alexander Hamilton
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (“A HAMILTON”) TO ELIZABETH HAMILTON, COMMISERATING OVER HER ILL HEALTH AND CONSIDERING THE PRACTICALITY OF HIS FAMILY TRAVELLING TO JOIN HIM
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts

|
New York

Alexander Hamilton
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (“A HAMILTON”) TO ELIZABETH HAMILTON, COMMISERATING OVER HER ILL HEALTH AND CONSIDERING THE PRACTICALITY OF HIS FAMILY TRAVELLING TO JOIN HIM
2 pages (8 7/8 x 7 3/8 in.; 227 x 186 mm) on a bifolium, [Philadelphia?, May 1786–April, 1788], autograph address on integral leaf (“Mrs. Elizabeth Hamilton | Wall Street | New York”); small seal tear, fore-edge of integral leaf restored, some browning. Tipped to a larger sheet.
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Literature

The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, ed. Syrett, 3:673

Catalogue Note

"I feel that it will be impossible for me to submit to a long separation however inconvenient it may be to incur the expence which will attend [you] coming here." Writing, probably, from Philadelphia, Hamilton raises the question of Eliza and the children joining him. “Three or four days since I wrote to My angel by the Post, since which I have received a letter from her. I am very unhappy to hear that my beloved is out of health. Heaven grant it may soon be restored. I entreat her to take care of herself & keep up her spirits. I cannot yet determine what will be our stay here and consequently I can make no determinations about my love; but I feel that it will be impossible for me to submit to a long separation however inconvenient it may be to incur the expence which will attend her coming here. I entreat you my charmer to let me hear from you as often as possible; for I stand in need of every consolation you can give for my absence from your dear bosom. Give my love to my darling Philip & kiss with all possible tenderness the other two. Adieu my dearest angel. Heaven bless you.” It is uncertain why, with two blank pages at his disposal, Hamilton chose to conclude this letter by writing his final five lines longitudinally in the left margin of the first page.

While undated, this letter must have written between the birth of Hamilton and Elizabeth’s third child, Alexander, on 16 May 1786, and the birth of their fourth, James Alexander, on 14 April 1788. Given Hamilton’s reference to a potentially long absence from home, it is entirely possible that the letter was written during his attendance at the Constitutional Convention, May to September 1787.

Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts

|
New York