1008
Alexander Hamilton
AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO CATHERINE VAN RENSSELAER SCHUYLER, CONFIRMING HIS ENGAGEMENT TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
1008
Alexander Hamilton
AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO CATHERINE VAN RENSSELAER SCHUYLER, CONFIRMING HIS ENGAGEMENT TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts

|
New York

Alexander Hamilton
AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO CATHERINE VAN RENSSELAER SCHUYLER, CONFIRMING HIS ENGAGEMENT TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH
2 pages (8 3/4 x 7 3/8 in.; 222 x 185 mm) on a bifolium, [Morristown, New Jersey], 14 April 1780; Hamilton’s signature neatly clipped away costing 4 words, silked. Tipped to a larger sheet. 
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Literature

The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, ed. Syrett, 2:309–310

Catalogue Note

The earliest confirmation of Hamilton’s engagement to Elizabeth Schuyler and the only known letter from Hamilton to his mother-in-law. This letter demonstrates that no more than three months after their first acquaintance, Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler had reached an understanding that they were to be wed—and that they had received the consent of her parents. While Hamilton undoubtedly spoke with Philip Schuyler in person, he here sends his warm acknowledgment to Elizabeth’s mother.

“The inclosed letter came to hand two days ago, and I take the earliest opportunity of forwarding it. I cannot forbear indulging my feelings, by entreating you to accept the assurances [of my] gratitude for your kind [complia]nce with my wishes to be [united] to your amiable daughter. I leave it to my conduct rather than expressions to testify the sincerity of my affection for her, the respect I have for her parents, the desire I shall always feel to justify their confidence and merit their friendship. May I hope Madam, you will not consider it as mere profession, when I add, that though I have not the happiness of a personal acquaintence with you, I am no stranger to the qualities which distinguish your character and these make the relation in which I shall stand to you, not one of the least pleasing circumstances of my union with your daughter. My heart anticipates the sentiments of that relation and wishes to give you proofs of the respectful and affectionate attachment, with which I have the honor to be"

Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts

|
New York