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PROPERTY FROM A DANISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

Vilhelm Hammershøi
DANISH
WOMAN BEFORE A MIRROR, STRANDGADE 30
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 465,000 GBP (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
10

PROPERTY FROM A DANISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

Vilhelm Hammershøi
DANISH
WOMAN BEFORE A MIRROR, STRANDGADE 30
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 465,000 GBP (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century European Paintings

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London

Vilhelm Hammershøi
1864 - 1916
DANISH
WOMAN BEFORE A MIRROR, STRANDGADE 30
signed with initials lower left
oil on canvas
46 by 38.5cm., 18 by 15in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Klas Fåhræus, Stockholm (by 1918. Fåhræus, 1863-1944, was a Swedish writer, art critic, and collector who fraternised with August Strindberg, Carl Larsson, Karl Nordstrom, Oscar Björck, and Nils Kreuger in Grez-sur-Loing in the 1880s. As a shareholder in several thriving Stockholm companies and factories, in 1909-11 he and his wife Olga were able to build the Villa Högberga in Lidingö in the Stockholm archipelago, which served as both their home and an art gallery and which, until the crash of 1929, boasted one of the greatest and most expensive art collections in Sweden.)
Sale: Bruun Rasmussen, Copenhagen, August 1959, lot 143
Purchased at the above sale by the grandfather of the present owners; thence by descent

Exhibited

Copenhagen, Kunstforeningen, 1955, no. 39
Copenhagen, Kunstforeningen, 1966, no. 22

Literature

Alfred Bramsen & Sophus Michaëlis, Vilhelm Hammershøi. Kunstneren og hans værk, Copenhagen & Christiania, 1918, p. 106, no. 294

Catalogue Note

Strandgade 30, where the artist and his wife Ida lived from 1899-1909, occupies a central role in Hammershøi’s oeuvre as both the subject and setting of his most important interiors. Painted in 1906, the present work belongs to the series of views of the small living room at the back of their first-floor flat, with its window overlooking the courtyard. By times with a figure and pieces of furniture, by times without, lit by sunlight or by moonlight, the effect is one of solitude and introspection, the viewer - as much as the observed figure - sealed in a hermetic world. Here, Ida ties her hair before a mirror set on a dressing table. Rays of morning sunshine filter through the panes of the casement window. The composition is striking for its focus, the upper half of the window cropped and the door to the right omitted completely.

The influence of interiors of the Dutch Golden Age on Hammershøi, particularly the work of Vermeer, is well-documented, and one of the first works in this series was apparently inspired by a painting by Pieter Janssen Elinga in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich, of which Hammershøi owned a print (fig. 1, formerly attributed to Pieter de Hooch). Other prominent works in the series of views of the present room include: Sunbeams of 1900 (Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen); Interior with Two Candles of 1904 (Private collection, sold at Sotheby’s in May 2012); The Coin Collector of the same year, featuring the artist’s brother Svend (Nasjonalmuseet, Oslo); Interior of 1906 (Tate Gallery, London), and Moonlight, Strandgade 30, acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York in 2012 (fig. 2).

19th Century European Paintings

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London