10
10
Ansel Adams
'MOONRISE, HERNANDEZ, NEW MEXICO'
Estimate
100,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 200,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
10
Ansel Adams
'MOONRISE, HERNANDEZ, NEW MEXICO'
Estimate
100,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 200,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Photographs

|
New York

Ansel Adams
1902-1984
'MOONRISE, HERNANDEZ, NEW MEXICO'
oversized, mounted to Flaxon illustration board, signed in ink on the mount, the photographer's Carmel studio stamps (BMFA 6 and 7), with title in ink, on the reverse, framed, 1941, printed circa 1969; accompanied by the original typed correspondence on the photographer's Carmel studio letterhead (2)
21 by 26 1/2  in. (53.3 by 67.3 cm.)
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Provenance

Acquired from the photographer, 1969

Literature

Ansel Adams (Morgan & Morgan, 1972), pl. 63

James Alinder and John Szarkowski, Ansel Adams: Classic Images (Boston, 1985), pl. 32

Andrea G. Stillman, ed., Ansel Adams: The Grand Canyon and the Southwest (Boston, 2000), frontispiece

John Szarkowski, Ansel Adams at 100 (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2001), pl. 96

Ansel Adams, Examples: The Making of 40 Photographs (Boston, 2002), p. 40

Karen E. Haas and Rebecca A. Senf, Ansel Adams in the Lane Collection (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2005), pl. 37

Andrea G. Stillman, Ansel Adams: 400 Photographs (Boston, 2007), p. 175

Catalogue Note

The oversized print of Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico, offered here, made in the late 1960s, is not only larger than the 16-by-20-inch-format prints that Adams typically made throughout his career, but also even larger than the 20-by-24-inch-format edition commissioned by Lunn Gallery in 1975. 

This print of Adams’s best-known image was acquired directly from the photographer in 1969, after the present owner saw Moonrise on exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  When Adams prepared to print the photograph offered here, he wrote to its buyer, ‘I shall be pleased to make up this print at the earliest opportubity [sic].  I cannot guarantee it will be “exactly” identical to the one you saw in the Museum, but it will be equally good— if not better!’  Indeed, this particular rendering has a wide range of tones, especially in the sky area, not typically associated with prints made in this era.  Wispy clouds, obscured in other darker prints made in this period, are clearly visible in this print.  This photograph has remained in the same collection for over four decades.

Adams made the 8-by-10-inch negative for Moonrise in the late afternoon of 1 November 1941, while photographing in the Southwest on behalf of the U. S. Department of the Interior and the U. S. Potash Company of New Mexico.  Driving back to his motel after an unproductive day of photographing, Adams passed the tiny town of Hernandez.  Struck by the quality of light upon the town and its attendant cemetery, he immediately pulled the car over to the side of the road and hastily assembled his equipment.  Adams was able to make just one exposure before the sun sank behind a bank of clouds, and the light changed completely. 

Photographs

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New York