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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARJORIE S. FISHER, PALM BEACH

Fernando Botero(b. 1932)
MAN ON A HORSE
JUMP TO LOT
19

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARJORIE S. FISHER, PALM BEACH

Fernando Botero(b. 1932)
MAN ON A HORSE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Latin America: Modern Art | Latin America: Contemporary Art

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New York

Fernando Botero(b. 1932)
MAN ON A HORSE
inscribed with artist signature; also numbered 3/3 and stamped with foundry mark
bronze
137 by 90 1/2 by 63 in.
348 by 230 by 160 cm
Executed in 1999. 
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This work is accompanied by a photo certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. 

Provenance

Collection of the artist 
Acquired from the above 

Exhibited

Florence, Piazza della Signoria, Botero a Piazza Signoria, June 23-September 10, 2000, p. 128-129, illustrated in color
New York, Marlborough Gallery, Botero: Monumental Sculpture, May 10-June 16, 2001, p. 6-7, illustrated in color
Venice, Palazzo Duccale, Botero a Venezia: Sculture e dipinti, April 12-July 12, 2003, p. 106-107, illustrated in color
Tokyo, Yebisu Garden Place, Botero at Ebisu, March 31-July 11, 2004, p. 72-73, no. 16, illustrated in color
Singapore, Esplanade Theatres on the Bay, Botero in Singapore, December 8, 2004-February 27, 2005 

Literature

Ana Maria Escallón, "The Genesis of Fernando Botero's Sculptures," Sculpture Review, Fall 2001, no. 24, illustrated 

Catalogue Note

"We must keep in mind that the equestrian image has been used since antiquity to signify nobility and courage. The equestrian statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on the Capitoline Hill in Rome is the earliest surviving example of this genre. It represents one of the many ways that ancient sculptures depicted the majesty and glory of the emperor. The pose was taken up in the Middle Ages and with even greater enthusiasm in the Renaissance, when it was used by such artists as Verrocchio and Donatello. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, sculptors such as Bernini, François Girardon, and Etienne Maurice Falconet employed this sort of image with great success... Botero...has the greatest reverence for horses, as we have seen: his father rode a horse through the hills of Antioquia; Pedro [the artist's son] rides a hobby horse in the representations of him, both painted and sculpted. Botero's use of the figure of the horse is something akin to Cervantes' use of the nag Rocinante in Don Quixote. Downtrodden and worn out, the horse is the constant companion of man in his journeys and travails. In reading Cervantes' great novel, we increasingly feel the author's affection for the horse. Botero's equally affectionate evocations of all his various animals remind us that he thinks of these creatures as integral to his own personal universe." 
-Edward J. Sullivan, Botero Sculpture, New York, 1986, p. 80-82, 135-137 

Latin America: Modern Art | Latin America: Contemporary Art

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New York