396
396

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Joan Miró
COQ
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 312,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
396

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Joan Miró
COQ
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 312,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Joan Miró
1893 - 1983
COQ
Inscribed Miró, numbered 8/8 and inscribed with the foundry mark Susse Fondeur Paris 
Bronze
Height: 21 in.
53.3 cm
Conceived in 1970 and cast during the artist's lifetime in an edition of 9 numbered 0/8 through 8/8 plus 2 artist's proofs. 
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Provenance

Galerie Maeght, Paris (acquired directly from the artist)
The Pace Gallery, New York
James Goodman Gallery, New York
Acquired from the above

Literature

Alain Jouffroy & Joan Teixidor, Miró Sculptures, Paris, 1980, no. 176, illustration of another cast p. 123
Fundació Joan Miró, Obra de Joan Miró, Barcelona, 1988, no. 1577, illustration of another cast p. 431
Pierre Gimferrer, The Roots of Miró, Barcelona, 1993, no. 1256, illustration of another cast p. 407
Franco Basile, Joan Miró, Bologna, 1997, illustration in color of another cast p. 231
Emilio Fernández Miró & Pilar Ortega Chapel, Joan Miró, Sculptures. Catalogue raisonné, 1928-1982, Paris, 2006, no. 198, illustration in color of another cast p. 199

Catalogue Note

Miró's sculpture assemblages are among his most inventive works of art. These post-war creations draw upon the artist's radical experimentation as a Surrealist in the 1930s, and also address issues of abstraction, figuration and conceptualism that were central concerns of artists working in post-war Europe and the United States. Re-purposing utilitarian objects like forks, pipes and wire, the artist would devise fanciful artistic creations that allowed him to reinterpret the world around him. The present sculpture of a rooster is a brilliant example of Miró's artistic alchemy.

This bronze was executed from a ceramic version of Coq, made by the artist in 1956. It was around this time that Miró's fellow Spaniard Picasso was equally fowl-minded in his approach to sculptural assemblages, creating his famous La Grue, 1951-52, from similar "found" objects from his studio (see fig. 1).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York