357
357

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Joan Miró
LE TRÉSOR ET LA MÈRE UBU
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 275,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
357

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Joan Miró
LE TRÉSOR ET LA MÈRE UBU
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 275,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Joan Miró
1893 - 1983
LE TRÉSOR ET LA MÈRE UBU
Signed Miró. (lower right)
Gouache and watercolor over lithograph on paper
16 1/2 by 25 1/2 in.
41.9 by 64.8 cm
Executed in 1954.
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ADOM has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

Provenance

Tériade, Paris
Perls Galleries, New York
Brett Mitchell Collection, Inc., New York
Acquired from the above in 1982

Literature

Fernand Mourlot, Joan Miró Lithographs, 1964-1969, vol. III, Paris, 1977, no. 48, illustration of the lithograph p. 96

Catalogue Note

This unique work, a gouache over printed lithograph, was one of a series of paintings made by Miró around 1954 in anticipation of a new edition of the celebrated Alfred Jarry play "Ubu Roi" to be published by Tériade, the noted editor of Verve magazine. Tériade aptly chose Miró to illustrate the text as Miró, one of the original Surrealists, was familiar with the text and its profound influence on his circle.


Jarry's character of Ubu Roi (Père Ubu) was the modernist anti-hero and identifiable by Miró as a critique of the Franco regime in his native Spain. Cruel and coarse, acting always outside the rules of polite society, Ubu ingratiates himself into the court of the King of Poland. Eventually killing his host, la Mère Ubu attempts to steal her husband’s cached booty, ending up in the arms of his foe. Returning to her husband for forgiveness, she takes the form of the angel Gabriel, and is saved by the entrance of her former lover mid-conflict, with the Macbethian plot ending with Ubu and his wife fleeing to France. These absurdist pathways and characters fascinated the Surrealists who saw a prescient reflection of their current society and its political players.


Although these works were made in the early 1950s, they were not publicly shown until the early 1980s. An exhibition of the entire series took place at Perls Gallery in New York in 1982. John Russell, writing in the New York Times, effused: "The radiance of the color, the energy of the drawing and the freedom of the invention make these paintings a joy to look at if we have never heard of Alfred Jarry and regard General Franco as a fabulous monster, long forgotten" (John Russell, "Critics' Choices" in The New York Times, April 11, 1982, p. 3).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York