324
324
Joan Miró
TÊTE
Estimate
600,000800,000
JUMP TO LOT
324
Joan Miró
TÊTE
Estimate
600,000800,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Joan Miró
1893 - 1983
TÊTE
Signed Miró (toward upper left); titled and dated 18/XII/74 (on the verso)
Oil, gouache, brush and ink and colored crayon on paper
28 3/4 by 23 1/2 in.
73 by 59.8 cm
Executed on December 18, 1974.
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Provenance

Galerie Maeght, Paris
Ollendorff Fine Arts, New York
Galería Theo, Madrid
Sale: Christie's, New York, May 13, 1987, lot 184 
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Paris, Galerie Pierre Levy, Miró, 2010

Literature

Jacques Dupin & Ariane Lelong-Mainaud, Joan Miró, Catalogue raisonné. Drawings 1973-1976, vol. IV, Paris, 2013, no. 2632, illustrated in color p. 119

Catalogue Note

With its jarring amalgamation of facial features, Miró's Tête explores the subversive potential of his established lexicon of signs and symbols. His highly graphic rendering of this "head" pays little regard to defining its titular subject other than with its striking red eyes, and the painting as a whole is purely a vehicle for the artist's emphatic application of paint. The gesture is analogous to the tag of an urban graffiti artist, where the economized, bold mark is the unmistakable calling card of a complex artistic persona.

By the time he completed the present work, Miró's compositions had gained a level of expressive freedom and exuberance that evidenced his confidence in his craft. Images of women, stars, birds and moons were omnipresent in his pictures to the point that these elements became memes for the artist's own identity. Jacques Dupin elaborated on the semiotic importance of the figuration in these late paintings: "[T]he sign itself was no longer the image's double, it was rather reality assimilated then spat out by the painter, a reality he had incorporated then liberated, like air or light. The importance of the theme now depended on its manner of appearing or disappearing, and the few figures Miró still endlessly named and inscribed in his works are the natural go-between and guarantor of the reality of his universe. It would perhaps be more fruitful to give an account of those figures that have disappeared than of the survivors" (Jacques Dupin, Joan Miró, Catalogue raisonné, Paintings, vol. V, Paris, 2003, pp. 39-40).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York