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PROPERTY FROM THE MINA MERRILL PRINDLE COLLECTION

A Set of Four Egyptian Banded Alabaster Canopic Jars, 26th Dynasty, 664-525 B.C.
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 432,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
7

PROPERTY FROM THE MINA MERRILL PRINDLE COLLECTION

A Set of Four Egyptian Banded Alabaster Canopic Jars, 26th Dynasty, 664-525 B.C.
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 432,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Ancient Egyptian Sculpture & Works of Art

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New York

A Set of Four Egyptian Banded Alabaster Canopic Jars, 26th Dynasty, 664-525 B.C.
belonging to the scribe Nisuese, of slightly flaring ovoid form carved with four columns of inscription, and surmounted by lids representing the Four Sons of Horus, from the left human-headed Imsety, protector of the liver, with full lower lip and grooved eyes with traces of pigment, jackal-headed Duamutef, protector of the stomach, with nostrils summarily indicated and carefully incised eyes, falcon-headed Qebehsenuef, protector of the intestines, with sharply hooked beak and eyes carved in raised relief, and baboon-headed Hapy, protector of the lungs, with finely incised mouth, recessed circular nostrils, and large grooved eyes.
Heights 16, 17 1/2, 16 1/2, and 16 in. 40.7, 44.4, 41.9, and 40.7 cm.
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Provenance

Nicolas Tano, Rue Kamel  no. 7, Cairo
Mrs. Mina Merrill Prindle (1864-1963), Duluth, Minnesota and Pasadena, California, acquired from the above about April 18th, 1923
thence by descent to the present owners

Catalogue Note

The inscriptions contain prayers and record the name of the owner of the jars, the scribe Nisuese, and name each of the Four Sons of Horus and their respective responsible goddess. Other examples of complete sets with their lids are in the Museo Gregoriano Egizio, Vatican City (G. Botti and P. Romanelli, Le Sculture del Museo Gregoriano Egizio, Vatican City, 1951, nos. 67-70), Liverpool Museum (P.Bienkowski and A. Tooley, Gifts of the Nile: Ancient Egyptian Arts and Crafts in the Liverpool Museum, 1995, pl. 114), the A.V. Lane Collection, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Cairo, JE 85915, painted alabaster jars of Psusennes I, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (S. D’Auria, P. Lacovara, and C.H.Roehrig, Mummies & Magic, The Funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt, Boston, 1998, no. 137); also compare Sotheby’s, New York, November 28th, 1990, no. 67.

Mrs. Prindle first saw this set of canopic jars on a visit to Nicholas Tano’s Cairo establishment early in 1922, but did not finalize the purchase until the following year. A lengthy correspondence between them followed her visit, and also between her and the American Express office and the American Legation in Cairo. In the course of these communications, Tano writes that the jars had been seen and dated by both James Henry Breasted of the Oriental Institute at Chicago and H.E. Winlock of the Metropolitan Museum, two of the world’s most renowned Egyptologists. Also included is a photograph of the jars with a note from Winlock on the back suggesting their 26th Dynasty date, and a letter from him to Mrs. Prindle noting that his museum “…had a great many dealings with Tano and never regretted any of them”.  

Ancient Egyptian Sculpture & Works of Art

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New York