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PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF THE LATE STANLEY J. SEEGER

A Roman Marble Torso of Apollo or Dionysos, circa 2nd Century A.D.
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 118,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
15

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF THE LATE STANLEY J. SEEGER

A Roman Marble Torso of Apollo or Dionysos, circa 2nd Century A.D.
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 118,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Ancient Marbles: Classical Sculpture and Works of Art

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London

A Roman Marble Torso of Apollo or Dionysos, circa 2nd Century A.D.
standing with the weight on his right leg, his hair falling in long curls over the shoulders in front and in back, trace of a strut on the right hip; no restorations.
Height 37 cm. 14 1/2 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Amy Gwen Mond, Baroness Melchett (d. 1982), Mulberry House, Westminster, London (Sotheby's, London, July 9th, 1974, no. 179, illus.)

Literature

C.H. Reilly, "Mulberry House, Westminster. Recent alterations carried out for Lady Melchet by Mr. Darcy Braddell," Country Life, June 6th, 1931, p. 738, fig. 6 (on shelf to right of fireplace); the bearded marble head, visible on the cited photo above the fireplace, is now in Copenhagen: A. Nielsen and J. Ostergaard, Catalogue Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. Hellenism, 1997, p. 66f., no. 33.

Catalogue Note

In 1920 Amy Gwen Wilson married Henry Mond, who upon the death of his father became 2nd Baron Melchett. An artist herself, she was the subject of portraits by other artists of her day. A photograph by Ida Kar in the National Portrait Gallery shows Baroness Melchett reclining next to her portrait bust by Sir Jacob Epstein.

In the introduction to the 1928 catalogue of the Melchett Collection Eugenie Strong writes that “the name of Mond remains permanently associated with the splendid Italian pictures brought together by Ludwig Mond [1839-1909] and now housed in the National Gallery. Love of art and collecting was in the Mond tradition, and to this the younger generation continues faithful” (E. Strong, Catalogue of the Greek and Roman Antiques in the Possession of the Rt. Honorable Lord Melchett, P.C., D.Sc., F.R.S., 1928). Ludwig Mond’s son Alfred, 1st Baron Melchett (1868-1930), began expanding the breadth of the collection early in the 20th Century, and it seems probable that the torso of Apollo was acquired by him, the father-in-law of Gwen, wife of the 2nd Baron.

Ancient Marbles: Classical Sculpture and Works of Art

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London