16
16

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

Joaquín Sorolla
SPANISH
VUELTA DE LA PESCA (RETURN OF THE CATCH)
Estimate
150,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT
16

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

Joaquín Sorolla
SPANISH
VUELTA DE LA PESCA (RETURN OF THE CATCH)
Estimate
150,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century European Paintings

|
London

Joaquín Sorolla
1863 - 1923
SPANISH
VUELTA DE LA PESCA (RETURN OF THE CATCH)
signed and dated J Sorolla B / 1908 lower right
oil on canvas
25.5 by 37.5cm., 10 by 14½in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

To be included in the Sorolla catalogue raisonné being prepared by Blanca Pons Sorolla (BPS 1906).

Provenance

Arturo Ramón, Barcelona
Purchased from the above by the father of the present owner in the 1970s; thence by descent

Exhibited

New York, The Hispanic Society of America, Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1909, no. 339
Boston, Copley Society of Art; Buffalo, Fine Arts Academy, Paintings by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida exhibited by the Hispanic Society of America, 1909, no. 195

Literature

Bernardino de Pantorba, La vida y la obra de Joaquín Sorolla. Estudio Biográfico y Crítico, Madrid, 1953, p. 193 , no. 1669, catalogued (as Playa de Valencia)
Eight Essays on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, ed. Hispanic Society of America, Llanera, 2009, vol. II, p. 414, no. 339, illustrated

Catalogue Note

Painted on El Cabañal beach, Valencia, in 1908, the present work takes up a theme that preoccupied Sorolla like no other: returning fishermen attended by their wives and daughters carrying baskets in which to carry to market the day's catch. The subject had first attracted Sorolla in the early 1890s when he painted his large scale canvas La Vuelta de la pesca in 1894, and exhibited it to great acclaim at the Paris Salon of 1895 (bought by the French State, and now in the Musée d'Orsay). The present work, painted in situ, evokes the bustling atmosphere of the fishing community on the Valencian beach. 

The close cropping of Vuelta de la pesca, in particular of the foreshortened beached fishing boat in the foreground, reveals Sorolla's lively dialogue with the medium of photography. The composition is framed as though through the viewfinder of a camera, and the rapid, fleeting brushstroke add to the spontaneity of the snapshot view. As a teenager Sorolla apprenticed in the photography studio of Antonio Garcia in Valencia, later marrying his son Clotilde, an experience which strongly informed his later aesthetic.

This work is archived in the Hispanic Society of America (HSA) as negative no. 539.

19th Century European Paintings

|
London