87
87
Studio of Hendrick Ter Brugghen
A MAN PLAYING A LUTE AND A MAN PLAYING A VIOLA DA BRACCIO: A PAIR
Estimate
30,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT
87
Studio of Hendrick Ter Brugghen
A MAN PLAYING A LUTE AND A MAN PLAYING A VIOLA DA BRACCIO: A PAIR
Estimate
30,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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Studio of Hendrick Ter Brugghen
DEVENTER 1588 - 1629 UTRECHT
A MAN PLAYING A LUTE AND A MAN PLAYING A VIOLA DA BRACCIO: A PAIR
Man playing a lute signed and dated indistinctly TB 1622 (lower left)
Man playing a viola da braccio signed and dated indistinctly HTB 1622 (lower right) 
Each: Oil on canvas
Unframed: 26 1/2 by 22 3/4 in.; 67.5 by 58 cm
Framed: 36 1/4 by 32 in.; 92 by 81.3 cm
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Provenance

With Pootjes, Ardenhout, The Netherlands;
With Christophe Janet, New York, 1984;
Linda and Gerald Guterman, Ltd., New York.

Exhibited

New York, Christophe Janet Ltd., The Intimate Vision as Seen Through a Selection of Seventeenth Century Dutch Paintings, 1984, no. 5 (as by Ter Brugghen).

Literature

L.J. Slatkes and W. Franits, The Paintings of Hendrick ter Brugghen, 1588-1629: Catalogue Raisonné, Amsterdam and Philadelphia 2007, pp. 233-234, cat. nos. WTBVB14 and WTBVB15, reproduced, plates 109 and 110 (as Joint workshop of ter Brugghen and van Baburen). 

Catalogue Note

Ter Brugghen's half-length musicians were among his most popular works, as they contain the freedom of playful expression and strength of bold paint handling for which he is so greatly admired. The distinctive physiognomic type of these two models, their facial expressions, and the half-length, close-up compositions are characteristic of the type of musical subjects the artist and his studio executed during the first half of the 1620s. The same model, or at least a drawing of his features, was used for the lute player in a signed and dated work by Ter Brugghen in which the player gazes at the viewer with a very similar smiling expression.1

As early as 1621 Ter Brugghen executed a pendant pair of single-figure Flute Players, in the Staatliche Museen, Kassel, which set the artistic standard for this new subject matter in Utrecht and elsewhere. One of these, the transverse flute player, is dressed in a colorful costume with striped sleeves and wearing a feathered beret set at a rakish angle to frame his head. In 1624, Ter Brugghen painted Two Singing Lute Players, now in the Musée National des Beaux-Arts d'Alger, Algiers, and the National Gallery, London, both of which wear costumes and berets similar to those found in the present works. Those two compositions exist in no less than two autograph repetitions, each a strong indication of the popularity of the theme and musical subjects in general. 

1. See literature, Slatkes and Franits 2007, cat. no. TW13 (as Ter Brugghen and Workshop). 

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