120
120

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MIRIAM AND IRA D. WALLACH

A Derby porcelain yellow-ground part tea and coffee service circa 1795-1800
Estimate
12,00018,000
JUMP TO LOT
120

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MIRIAM AND IRA D. WALLACH

A Derby porcelain yellow-ground part tea and coffee service circa 1795-1800
Estimate
12,00018,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Sotheby's Designer Showhouse

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A Derby porcelain yellow-ground part tea and coffee service circa 1795-1800
each reserved on the front or in the center with a gilt-edged panel, titled on the underside, naturalistically painted with rural landscapes beneath the gilt laurel garland border at the rim; comprising: an oval teapot, stand and cover, two milk jugs, four teacups and saucers and four coffee cans, crowned crossed batons and D marks, inscribed titles, pattern number 531. 17 pieces.
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Provenance

Sold, The Property of Richard Buckingham, Esq, Christie, Manson and Woods, November 16, 1970, lot 114 (The teapot, cover and stand; two teacups and saucers and two coffee cans)

Literature

The teapot, cover and stand, John Twitchett, FRSA, Derby Porcelain, p.188, cat. no.224

Catalogue Note

The paintings on the teapot and stand are "strongly attributed" to Thomas 'Jockey' Hill by John Twitchett in Derby Porcelain, p.189. Three teacups, two saucers and two coffee cans in the present service exhibit similar characteristics and appear to have been painted by the same hand.
'Jockey' Hill joined Derby in 1794, where he worked as a landscape painter until 1800. According to Franklin A. Barrett and Arthur L. Thorpe in Derby Porcelain 1750-1848, pp. 57-58, Hill is specifically known to have painted landscapes "on pieces with the 'canary' yellow ground for which Derby was justifiably famous." Hill's stylistic attributes include delicately-painted small figures in the distance, his use of a bright palette and his preference for yellow tones for painting grass. For comparable examples of 'Jockey' Hill's style, see F. Brayshaw Gilhespy, Derby Porcelain, cat. no.96. and John Twitchett and Henry Sandon, Landscapes on Derby and Worcester Porcelain, pp.22-23.
The remaining components of this service, mostly depicting Scottish views, are possibly painted by George Robertson, who also was as one of the finest landscape and marine painters in the Derby factory. Robertson favored Scottish landscapes as a native of Scotland and used fall colors in his compositions, according to Twitchett and Sandon, ibid, where his landscape paintings for the same service are illustrated on pp. 24, 25 and 41. A pair of coffee cans from the same service is also illustrated by Anthony Hoyte, The Charles Norman Collection of 18th Century Derby Porcelain, p. 57.

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