78

Details & Cataloguing

Rock & Pop

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London

Jimi Hendrix
PRELIMINARY LYRICS AND DRAWING, CIRCA 1970
on a sheet of U.S. yellow lined legal paper, the seven lines of possible lyrics in black ballpoint reading "Hello night bird – How was | your day ? | Did you visit the gods in the | valleys far away ? | What did you bring me | in your | visit from the seas", with deletions, the page additionally inscribed "I brought you me! Devon" [Wilson] seemingly in response to Hendrix’s question "What did you bring me?", the page annotated with a doodle in Hendrix’s hand of a winged figure titled "MAKE LOVE TO ME" surrounded by doodles of a phallus, entwined figures, bells and a smiling mouth amongst other things, the top of the page inscribed in an unknown hand (possibly Devon’s) with two telephone numbers, 1 page (311 x 199mm.), mounted and framed (overall size 625 x 544mm.), top left corner missing, bottom and left edge rubbed with small nicks, some light staining overall
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Provenance

Red Ronnie Collection

Catalogue Note

The words on this page do not correspond to any lyrics of a released Hendrix song with the exception of the phrase "night bird". A song called 'Night Bird Flying' was recorded at Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios in New York in August 1970, just weeks before Hendrix’s death in London on 18 September. It was released posthumously in the UK in 1971 as the B-side to the single 'Angel'.

Devon Wilson was a famous 'supergroupie' in the 1960s who was linked with many famous artists including Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and Eric Clapton amongst others, but she was most closely associated with Hendrix, whom she met in 1969, and was apparently the inspiration for the blood-thirsty vamp in his song 'Dolly Dagger'. Their volatile relationship unravelled as Wilson became dependent on drugs and Hendrix distanced himself from her towards the end of his life. Devon died in a mysterious fall from a window of the Chelsea Hotel in New York in February 1971, just five months after Hendrix’s death from an overdose.

Rock & Pop

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