Lot 773
  • 773

Stradling, Sir John

Estimate
15,000 - 20,000 USD
Sold
12,500 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Stradling, Sir John
  • Beati Pacifici. A Divine Poem, Written to the Kings most Excellent Majestie ... 1622
  • paper
Royal presentation manuscript in a fine scribal hand, six-line dedicatory verse epistle to the King signed by the author, 413 six-line stanzas in praise of James I and his pacific policies in a single calligraphic italic hand, marginal glosses in a smaller hand by the same scribe, red-ruled margins and pencil line rules, 131 pages, 4to (195 x 155 mm), 1622; seemingly lacking four leaves (stanzas 1-24). Contemporary limp vellum gilt with double fillet border, panel formed by a dog tooth and double fillet with floral cornerpieces, centerpiece of the arms of James I with crown and garter against a background of fleur-de-lys, in a modern collector's box; holes for silk ties, some wear and staining.

Provenance

Lloyd, 5th Baron Kenyon— (1917-1993; armorial bookplate) acquisition: Bernard Quaritch, 1993

Catalogue Note

An exquisite royal presentation manuscript in its original binding. Sir John Stradling, Baronet (1563-1637), was a scholarly gentleman who inherited large estates in Wales and counted William Camden and Sir John Harington amongst his friends. Stradling had previously published Latin epigrams and translations of the neo-Stoic philosopher Justus Lipsius. This long poem draws on historical and Biblical precedents to praise King James I's policy of peace and nonintervention in European conflicts, criticises religious sectarianism, and urges Christendom to unite in a new crusade against the Turks.

In his prefatory verses, Stradling imagines his manuscript's presentation to the King and is keen to emphasise his humility — his words come not to press their author's views, "But brought as prisoners to receive from you, | Of death, or life, as likes you best, the doome." He appears to have received the validation he sought, for the following year he published the poem complete with the prefatory dedication to the King. 

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