127
127
Hermann Max Pechstein
DREI BADENDE AKTE (THREE NUDE BATHERS)
Estimate
800,0001,200,000
LOT SOLD. 1,570,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
127
Hermann Max Pechstein
DREI BADENDE AKTE (THREE NUDE BATHERS)
Estimate
800,0001,200,000
LOT SOLD. 1,570,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of A. Alfred Taubman: Modern & Contemporary Art

|
New York

Hermann Max Pechstein
1881 - 1955
DREI BADENDE AKTE (THREE NUDE BATHERS)
Signed with the initials HMP and dated 912 (lower right)
Oil on canvas laid down on canvas
32 by 28 1/4 in.
81.4 by 71.9 cm
Painted in 1912.

Please note that in the print catalogue for this sale, this lot appears as number 127T.


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Provenance

Dr. Karl Lilienfeld, New York
Margarete Lilienfeld, New York (by descent from the above in 1966)
Kunsthandel Wolfgang Werner KG, Berlin
Mrs. Frederick Haviland, New York (acquired from the above in 1983 and sold: Sotheby's, London, June 28, 1988, lot 43)
Acquired at the above sale by A. Alfred Taubman

Literature

Magdalena M. Moeller ed., Max Pechstein, Sein malerisches Werk, Munich, 1996, no. 74, illustrated in color n.p.
Aya Soika, Max Pechstein, Das Werkverzeichnis der Ölgemälde, 1905-1918, vol. I, Munich, 2011, illustrated p. 400

Catalogue Note

Drei Badende Akte was painted in Nidden in 1912. It was only in September of that year that Pechstein could travel to the remote fishing village on the Baltic coast; the previous months had been occupied with the decoration of the dining room at the Villa Hugo Perls in Berlin-Zehlendorf. Pechstein first visited Nidden in 1908 and returned to this pine-forested coastal village for several summers. Max Osborn comments that Nidden was "a forgotten human settlement, whose inhabitants have maintained their life and work, the flow of time, in a state just as unaltered as the ocean... Pechstein identified with these primitives, invaluable and serious companions" (Max Osborn, Max Pechstein Erinnerungen, Berlin, 1922, p. 88).

The present work is a powerful reflection of Pechstein's search for the bond between man and nature, both in his life and in his art. Whilst he was the first Brücke artist to move to Berlin in 1908, attracted by the dynamic life of that great urban center, he never lost his need and his romantic desire for the primitive. In Nidden, Pechstein was able to pursue his study of the harmony of the nude in nature, a theme that he had begun to explore with his fellow Brücke artists Heckel and Kirchner in 1910 in Moritzburg and Dangast. The theme of the nude moving freely and uninhibited in a landscape was a key preoccupation of these artists, who were fascinated by the potential for freedom of expression and closeness to nature, unfettered by the constraints of Western civilization. 

The Collection of A. Alfred Taubman: Modern & Contemporary Art

|
New York