204

PROPERTY FROM THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, SOLD FOR THE ACQUISITIONS FUND

English School, early 19th Century
LANDSCAPE WITH A HORSE-DRAWN CART
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 197,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
204

PROPERTY FROM THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, SOLD FOR THE ACQUISITIONS FUND

English School, early 19th Century
LANDSCAPE WITH A HORSE-DRAWN CART
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 197,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Master Paintings and Sculpture: Part II

|
New York

English School, early 19th Century
LANDSCAPE WITH A HORSE-DRAWN CART

Provenance

George A. Hearn, New York, by 1908;
By whom given to The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1909 (as John Crome, Inv. no. 10.58.2).

Literature

Catalogue of the Collection of Foreign and American Paintings Owned by Mr. George A. Hearn, New York 1908, pp. xi, 49, reproduced plate 56 (as John Crome);
"The Gift of Mr. George A. Hearn" and "Complete List of Accessions," in Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 5, May 1910, pp. 105, 129 (as John Crome);
P. M. Turner, "Pictures of the English School in New York," in The Burlington Magazine, 22, February 1913, p. 270 (as possibly a late work of Benjamin Parker [sic, for Barker]);
K. Baetjer, European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art by artists born before 1865, A Summary Catalogue, New York 1980, vol. I, p. 19, reproduced vol. II, p. 281 (as British, 19th century);
K. Baetjer, European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art by artists born before 1865, A Summary Catalogue, New York 1995, p. 205, reproduced (as British Painter, early 19th century);
M. Owens, "Design Notebook: At the Met, Britannia Rules Again" in The New York Times, 6 July 1995, reproduced p. C6 (view of the Aitken Gallery);
K. Baetjer, British Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1575–1875, New York 2009, pp. 208–209, cat. no. 104, reproduced.

Catalogue Note

When given to The Metropolitan Museum in 1909, this impressive landscape was ascribed to the Norwich School painter John Crome, but this attribution was ultimately rejected by Miklos Rajnai in 1965.1  Over the years, attributions to James Stark, Benjamin Barker and George Vincent have been proposed, but none of these suggestions has been fully convincing.  The painter was clearly influenced by Dutch 17th century landscapes which he could have studied in the sale rooms or in private collections.

 

1.  Letter in the archives of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and, again, verbally in 1971.

Master Paintings and Sculpture: Part II

|
New York