52
52
Gunther Gerzso
(1915-2000)
PAISAJE ROJO
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT
52
Gunther Gerzso
(1915-2000)
PAISAJE ROJO
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Latin America: Modern Art

|
New York

Gunther Gerzso
(1915-2000)
PAISAJE ROJO
signed and dated 59 lower right; also signed and dated on the reverse
oil on masonite
28 3/4 by 19 1/4 in.
73 by 49 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Gift of the artist (1959)

Catalogue Note

When I traveled to Mexico in 1946 I discovered pre-Columbian art. I discovered it in the emotional sense, in the same way as someone who says, “I finally understood Mozart or Bach.” I didn’t care whether the art belonged to the Mayan, Aztec or Totonacan culture. The fact was that I was very impressed by most of those objects. I guess this could sound ridiculous because my mother was German and my father Hungarian. What did I have to do with pre-Columbian art? And yet I was attracted to it in a tremendously emotional way. I began collecting it. I can’t explain it: I felt that I had something in common with the artists who had created these objects. And I also told myself, I live in Mexico and up to this moment I have been creating a sort of European Surrealist art influenced by Max Ernst, Tanguy, Dalí and others. Why don’t I make something that belongs to this country?

As a result of this I first painted a piece that was merely intuitive. I still work that way. To begin a painting I initially draw many lines on the canvas. Sometimes nothing comes out. Suddenly, I draw lines in the place where they belong, and there it is: a being that was underwater comes to the surface and slowly comes to life. Then I see it the next day and choose what stays and what goes, until I convince myself that the piece is ready, alive. I’ve been working the same way since 1946. In painting you can’t have much control over the outcome because sometimes one thing comes out and other times something else happens. You have to obey inspiration, despite my dislike of the term. There have been times when I’ve thought a work was done, and then I’ve looked at it again and decided to add more elements to it in order to make it stronger. Given my technique, I can’t erase anything; all elements need to be added and this is the biggest challenge.

Gunther Gerzso in conversation with José Antonio Aldrete-Haas
Poetry in Architecture Symposium, 1991

Latin America: Modern Art

|
New York