367
367

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, MIAMI

Baltasar Lobo
JEUNE FILLE À GENOUX 
Estimate
250,000350,000
JUMP TO LOT
367

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, MIAMI

Baltasar Lobo
JEUNE FILLE À GENOUX 
Estimate
250,000350,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Baltasar Lobo
1910 - 1993
JEUNE FILLE À GENOUX 
Inscribed Lobo and numbered 2/8
Bronze
Height: 60 5/8 in.
154 cm
Conceived in 1985 and cast in an edition of 8 plus 4 artist's proofs; this example cast in 1987 by the Bovinci foundry in Verona. 
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Galería Freites, Caracas
Acquired from the above 

Literature

Joseph-Emile Muller, Lobo, Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre sculpté, Paris, 1985, no. 513, illustration of the smaller version with round base n.p. 
Maîtres impressionnistes et modernes (exhibition catalogue), Galerie Daniel Malingue, Paris, 1987, no. 31, illustration of another cast n.p.
Lobo (exhibition catalogue), Galerie Daniel Malingue, Paris, 1988, no. 52, illustration of another cast n.p.
Gaston Diehl & Federic Palomero, Baltasar Lobo. La Perennidad de la Escultura: un problema primordial, Caracas, 2005, illustration of another cast p. 20
Baltasar Lobo. Esculturas monumentales (exhibition catalogue), Place de Zorilla & Paseo de Recoletos, Valledolid, 2007-08, illustration of another cast p. 74
Baltasar Lobo. Esculturas monumentales (exhibition catalogue), Places de la Alfalfa, de la Pascaderia et del Pan, Seville & Jardina Amalia Rodrigues, Lisbon, 2008, illustration of another cast p. 58
Baltasar Lobo. Esculturas monumentales (exhibition catalogue), Paseo del Prado, Madrid, 2008, illustration of another cast p. 60

Catalogue Note

Jeune fille à genoux exemplifies Lobo’s lifelong fascination with the feminine form. Born in 1910, in the small Zamora village of Cerecinos de Campos, he fled to Montparnasse in 1939 following the Spanish Civil War. While in Paris, he soon formed close relationships with not only Pablo Picasso, but also fellow sculptors Jacques Lipchitz and Henri Laurens. While working for Laurens, Lobo discovered his affinity for the female figure, all the while continuing to derive inspiration from the Iberian and Cycladic sculpture he had first encountered in the Archeological Museum in Madrid. When describing the Cycladic influence on Lobo’s oeuvre, Joseph-Emile Muller remarks, “[It is] not realistic. A simplified style of an archaic art, sometimes a little rough, sometimes elegant, by turns hieratic and informal. The style touched the depths of his being, and decisively contributed to his path" (Joseph-Emile Muller, op. cit., pp. 11-12).

In 1945, Lobo exhibited at Galerie Vendôme with other notable artists including Henri Matisse, Fernand Léger and Maurice Utrillo. Upon leaving Lauren’s studio in the 1950s, he transitioned toward his signature elegant style, inspired by the sculptures of Constantin Brancusi and Jean Arp. The present work, with its soft curves and abstracted minimal form, exemplifies the most desirable qualities of twentieth-century sculpture.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York