350
350

PROPERTY FROM A MIDWEST COLLECTION

Pablo Picasso
MANDOLINE SUR UN GUÉRIDON
Estimate
450,000650,000
JUMP TO LOT
350

PROPERTY FROM A MIDWEST COLLECTION

Pablo Picasso
MANDOLINE SUR UN GUÉRIDON
Estimate
450,000650,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Pablo Picasso
1881 - 1973
MANDOLINE SUR UN GUÉRIDON
Signed Picasso (center left); dated 6.6.20 (on the verso)
Gouache on paper
10 5/8 by 8 3/8 in.
27.1 by 21.2 cm
Executed on June 6, 1920.
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Provenance

Berggruen Collection, Paris (acquired by 1954)
Countess Seidenburg, New York
Erich Leinsdorf, Amsterdam
Saidenberg Gallery, New York
Acquired from the above in the late 1980s

Exhibited

New York, Marlborough Gallery & Saidenberg Gallery, Homage to Picasso, 1971, n.n. (titled Guitare et partition)

Literature

Christian Zervos, Pablo Picasso, Supplement aux volumes I à V, vol. VI, Paris, 1954, no. 1390, illustrated p. 165
The Picasso Project, ed., Picasso's Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings and Sculpture, Neoclassicism I, 1920-1921, San Francisco, 1995, no. 20-241, illustrated p. 75

Catalogue Note

As Picasso once stated, “There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterwards you can remove all traces of reality. There’s no danger then, anyway, because the idea of the object will have left an indelible mark. It is what started the artist off, excited his ideas, and stirred up his emotions. Ideas and emotions will in the end be prisoners in his work. Whatever they do, they can’t escape from the picture. They form an integral part of it, even when their presence is no longer discernible” (quoted in Christian Zervos, “Conversation avec Picasso,” in Cahiers d’Art, Paris, 1935, p. 176). 

In 1920, Picasso was hired to design costumes and sets for the ballet Pulcinella. Concurrently, he created a series of still lifes featuring items, such as mandolins, guitars, bowls of fruit and pedestal tables. The present composition epitomizes Picasso’s work of the early 1920s. While the objects are still abstracted in form, Picasso has rendered them with clear legibility, easily identified by the viewer. Douglas Cooper has commented that “Picasso was hoping to find for himself a workable equation of values between Cubist reality, visual reality, and the accepted pictorial reality created by the eye-fooling methods of naturalism” (Douglas Cooper, The Cubist Epoch, London, 1994, p. 211). 

The present work once held a prominent position in the collection of Austrian-born American conductor, Erich Leinsdorf. Leinsdorf studied conducting at University of Vienna and the Vienna Academy of Music. Leaving for America just weeks before the invasion of Vienna in 1938, Leinsdorf found his way to New York City and became the assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera at only twenty-five years of age. He served as the principle conductor at different points in his life for the Cleveland Orchestra, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra and New York Philharmonic.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York