208
208
A Large Bronze Incense Burner and Cover, Ding
Cast Mark and Period of Kangxi  
Estimate
2,000,0003,000,000
LOT SOLD. 2,440,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
208
A Large Bronze Incense Burner and Cover, Ding
Cast Mark and Period of Kangxi  
Estimate
2,000,0003,000,000
LOT SOLD. 2,440,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection: Later Bronzes

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Hong Kong

A Large Bronze Incense Burner and Cover, Ding
Cast Mark and Period of Kangxi  
the heavily cast vessel of archaistic ding form with a compressed spherical body supported on three long tubular legs, each with two horizontal bands of raised beading, the exterior crisply cast with a band of stylised double-lotus petals enclosing a ruyi head, the rim surmounted by a pair of arched inverted 'U'-shaped handles, the recessed lip accommodating a pierced matching domed cover cast with a band of reticulated floral scroll with five stylised lotus flowers, the raised reticulated knop cast in the form of an elaborate chilong, the base cast in kaishu with a six-character reign mark
27 cm., 10 5/8  in.
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Provenance

Sotheby's New York, 8th May 1981, lot 93.

Catalogue Note

The principle repositories of the Qing court collection in Beijing and Taipei are rich in examples of Kangxi reign-marked vessels in porcelain, painted enamel and cloisonné enamel, and there are also several published marked bronze vessels from later reigns, especially the Qianlong era. However, there are very few Kangxi reign-marked examples, and this is arguably the finest example preserved in any museum or private collection.

For a Kangxi reign-marked incense burner of liding form in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, see Rose Kerr, Later Chinese Bronzes, 1990, cat. no. 25. For examples at auction, see the smaller incense burner and cover sold in these rooms, 20th November 1984, lot 316, and again at Christie's Hong Kong, 28th November 2005, lot 1455; and a gold-splashed vase offered in our London rooms, 16th May 2012, lot 149.

The incense burner is likely to have been produced in the Palace Workshops, Beijing, possibly made for an Imperial temple. The form derives from the most majestic ritual bronze ding vessels of the Western Zhou dynasty, such as the famous example in the Shanghai Museum, illustrated in 'Shanghai Bowuguan', Wenwu, Beijing, 1985, pl. 41. It shares the same monumentally cast body as its prototype, with similar inverted 'U'-shaped handles and powerful tubular legs, but the decoration on the exterior has been modified from the wave band and taotie mask on the Western Zhou example to the lotus flowers and lingzhi on the Kangxi example. The elaborate pierced cover and reticulated dragon knop on the current piece is also a Qing innovation.

For a smaller Qianlong reign-marked bronze vessel of fangding form, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing, see Views of Antiquity in the Qing Imperial Palace. Special Exhibition to Celebrate the 80th Anniversary of the Establishment of the Palace Museum, Macau, 2005, no. 1.  For an example of large Qianlong reign-marked bronze vessels, see a pair of bronze vases of fanghu form, decorated with dragons and phoenix, sold in these rooms, 9th October 2007, lot 1322.

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection: Later Bronzes

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Hong Kong