501
501
Rare and important oval sgraffito glazed red earthenware dish with flowers and heart, attributed to Conrad Mumbouer (1761-1845) or John Monday (1809-1862)
Haycock Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1835-1845
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 281,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
501
Rare and important oval sgraffito glazed red earthenware dish with flowers and heart, attributed to Conrad Mumbouer (1761-1845) or John Monday (1809-1862)
Haycock Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1835-1845
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 281,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Visual Grace: Important American Folk Art from the Collection of Ralph O. Esmerian

|
New York

Rare and important oval sgraffito glazed red earthenware dish with flowers and heart, attributed to Conrad Mumbouer (1761-1845) or John Monday (1809-1862)
Haycock Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1835-1845

Provenance

George Horace Lorimer, Philadelphia
Bernard and S. Dean Levy, New York, 1977

Exhibited

On loan to IBM from the George Horace Lorimer Collection, c. 1942-1977

Literature

Schaffner, Cynthia V.A. and Susan Klein. Folk Hearts: A Celebration of the Heart Motif in American Folk Art. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, p. 93
Schwartz, Marvin D., Collectors' Guide to Antique American Ceramics. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1969, p. 24
Stoudt, John Joseph, Pennsylvania Folk Art: An Interpretation, Allentown, PA: Schleeter's, 1948, p. 324
American Radiance, The Ralph Esmerian Gift to the American Folk Art Museum, p. 144, fig. 107

Catalogue Note

A number of traditional potters working in southeastern Pennsylvania regularly produced different sizes of rectangular earthenware dishes with rounded corners, or "loaf pans," but few geometrically true oval examples such as this rare sgraffito-decorated version have survived. The decorative pattern, clay type, and glaze character of this example relate it to the work of Conrad Mumbouer and John Monday, two Bucks County potters whose close working relationship led to shared stylistic preferences and work patterns. -J..L.L.

Another oval example is pictured in Edwin Atlee Barber, Tulip Ware of the Pennsylvania-German Potters: An Historical Sketch of the Art of Slip-Decoration in the United States (1903; reprint, New York: Dover Publications, 1970), p. 202. Two scalloped oval versions are in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the H. F. duPont Winterthur Museum, Winterthur, Delaware.

Visual Grace: Important American Folk Art from the Collection of Ralph O. Esmerian

|
New York