141
141

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF JAN KRUGIER

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes
PORTRAIT OF THE PAINTER CESAR ARBASIA, BUST-LENGTH, WITHIN RED CHALK FRAMING LINES
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141

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF JAN KRUGIER

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes
PORTRAIT OF THE PAINTER CESAR ARBASIA, BUST-LENGTH, WITHIN RED CHALK FRAMING LINES
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Details & Cataloguing

Old Master & British Drawings

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Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes
FUENDETODOS 1746 - 1828 BORDEAUX
PORTRAIT OF THE PAINTER CESAR ARBASIA, BUST-LENGTH, WITHIN RED CHALK FRAMING LINES
Red chalk;
inscribed in red chalk in the lower border: Cesar  Arbasia./Pint.
174 by 126 mm
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Provenance

Juan Augustin Ceán Bermúdez;
Don Valentin Carderera;
With H.M. Calmann, London;
With R. E. Lewis,
from whom purchased in 1963 by Dr. and Mrs. David Elterman,
by whose Executors sold, London Christie's, 24 January 2001, lot 92, acquired at the sale by the late Jan Krugier ($140,000)

Exhibited

Los Angeles, Grunwald Graphic Arts Foundation, The Artist looks at Himself, 1966

Literature

X. de Salas, 'Portraits of Spanish Artists by Goya', The Burlington Magazine, CVI, January 1964, pp. 16-19, reproduced fig. 6;
P. Gassier and J. Wilson, Vie et Oeuvre de Francisco Goya, l'Oeuvre complet illustré, Fribourg, 1970 (English ed. 1971), no. 698;
P. Gassier, The Drawings of Goya, The Sketches, Studies and Individual Drawings, London, 1975, p. 189, no. 150, reproduced  

Catalogue Note

This interesting sheet is part of a series of portrait drawings which according to Carderera were executed by Goya about 1798, and given to Ceán Bermúdez to serve as the basis for illustrations to his Dictionary of Spanish Painters, published in 1800.1  In the end, the portraits were never engraved and the Dictionary was published without these illustrations.  Cesar Arbasia, the subject of the present drawing, was an Italian painter, a pupil of Zuccaro, whose portrait was to be included in this Dictionary of Spanish Painters because the artist worked in Spain, chiefly at Málaga and Cordova, at the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th century.2  Like all the other portraits in this series the present drawing is carefully executed in red chalk, the background finished with delicate horizontal strokes which surround the bust portrait, very much imitating the effect of a print.

Like the other portraits in this series, the present drawing is inscribed in block letters in the lower margin with the name of the artist depicted; this was rather necessary, as many of the artists that Goya represented in these portraits, including Arbasia, were not very well known masters.  As Gassier suggested, it is very likely that Goya owned an earlier print or portrait of Arbasia, on which he could base his own likeness. 

1. P. Gassier, The Drawings of Goya, The Sketches, Studies and Individual Drawings, London, 1975, p. 187
2.  Ibid.

 

Old Master & British Drawings

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