392
392

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
FEMME ALLONGÉE
JUMP TO LOT
392

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
FEMME ALLONGÉE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
1841-1919
FEMME ALLONGÉE
signed Renoir  (lower left)
oil on canvas
50 by 65.2cm, 19⅝ by 25⅝in.
Painted in 1915.
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This work will be included in the Renoir Catalogue critique being prepared by the Wildenstein Institute from the François Daulte, Durand-Ruel, Venturi, Vollard and Wildenstein archives.

Provenance

Private Collection (acquired circa 1950s)
Thence by descent to the present owner

Literature

Ambroise Vollard, Tableaux, Pastels & Dessins de Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paris, 1918, no. 288, illustrated p. 72

Catalogue Note

In the last years of his life, Renoir devoted himself to the recreation of an idyllic world largely undisturbed by references to modernity. The female nude had figured prominently in his work from his earliest years, and it proved to be a subject for which his attention never waned. In treatment, it had ranged from the high Impressionism of the Torse de femme au soleil of 1876 to the icy classical perfection of the Grandes baigneuses of 1887. After 1900, the nude became his most important theme, one that enabled him to unite responsiveness to the physical presence of his models, with his awareness of historical continuity.

Femme allongée is a superb example of Renoir's mature style, underscoring his ability to capture the feminine form with fluid, loose brushwork.  His unusual painting technique builds up a shimmering paint surface that gives his late nudes their distinctive quality. This style allowed Renoir to showcase an astonishing mastery of a broad range of painterly effects. John House has noted that he was able to 'combine breadth with extreme delicacy of effect. [...]  At times he painted very thinly and with much medium over a white priming, particularly in his backgrounds, allowing the tone and texture of the canvas to show through, and creating effects almost like watercolour. His figures tend to be more thickly painted, but not with single layers of opaque colour; instead fine streaks of varied hue are built up, which create a varied, almost vibrating surface" (John House in Renoir (exhibition catalogue), Hayward Gallery, London; Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Paris & Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1985-86, p. 278).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London