76
76
A Louis XVI ormolu mantel clock circa 1786, dial signed Robin Aux Galeries Du Louvre, the movement signed Robin A Paris
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 81,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
76
A Louis XVI ormolu mantel clock circa 1786, dial signed Robin Aux Galeries Du Louvre, the movement signed Robin A Paris
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 81,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English and European Decorative Arts

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New York

A Louis XVI ormolu mantel clock circa 1786, dial signed Robin Aux Galeries Du Louvre, the movement signed Robin A Paris
the ormolu struck with the number 1275 underneath crowned EL
Robert Robin (1741-1799), recorded at the Galeries du Louvre from 1786
height 25 in.; width 20 in.; depth 7 in.
63.5 cm; 51 cm; 18 cm
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Catalogue Note

The design for this clock is generally attributed to François Vion. A drawing executed by Duplessis is now in the Esmerian Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and shows a basically identical pendule à casolette. Clocks of this model, or with slight modifications, were particularly popular with the French royal family and their closest circle. Louis XVI, Marie-Antoinette, Mesdames Victoire and Adélaïde, the Marquis de Sérent, and the Comte de Provence are all known to have owned a clock of this design. Marie-Antoinette owned two examples, one at St. Cloud and one in Paris. Louis XVI purchased one for the Tuilleries in 1789. The most recent to appear at auction was that of the Comte de Provence having been sold French & Company, Christie’s New York, November 24, 1998, lot 14. The dial of the Comte’s version was also signed Robin, but in overall appearance it deviated from the original design as it was surmounted with two doves and not a flaming urn. The clock listed in the inventory (inv. no. 33) of the queen’s apartments matches the lot offered here; it is of the same size, utilizes the same marble and is signed by Robin. In fact, the dials on all known models are signed by Robin, which suggests that this particular clock maker had a monopoly on this model. The bronzier responsible for the fine ormolu work of these clocks is not known, but it has been suggested that it was the fondeur-ciseleur Jean-Jacques Lemoyne, see Jean-Dominique Augarde, Les Ouvriers du Temps, s.n., 1996, p. 262. Other pendules à casolette of this exact model include one in the Swedish Royal Collection and one in the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris.

Important English and European Decorative Arts

|
New York