131
131
Alfred William Hunt
MOUNT SNOWDON THROUGH CLEARING CLOUDS
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 23,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
131
Alfred William Hunt
MOUNT SNOWDON THROUGH CLEARING CLOUDS
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 23,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Green and Pleasant Land: Two Centuries of British Landscape Painting

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London

Alfred William Hunt
1830 - 1896
MOUNT SNOWDON THROUGH CLEARING CLOUDS
signed and dated l.r.: Alfred W Hunt/ 1857
watercolour with scratching out
31.5 by 48.5cm., 12½ by 19in.
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Provenance

Charles Nobbs, York;
Tennants, Leyburn, 23 November 2006, lot 777 (as Mountainous Landscape with Swirling Clouds)
The Maas Gallery, London, April 2007

Exhibited

Probably Royal Academy, 1857, no.761

Literature

John Ruskin, Notes on Pictures, 1903-12, XIV, p.117

Catalogue Note

In 1856 and 1857 Hunt worked upon several atmospheric landscapes in Snowdonia, including two versions of Cwm Trifaen showing the peak of Glyder Fach. It was probably John Ruskin’s observations of meteorological phenomena on the landscape published in the fourth volume of Modern Painters in April 1856 that reawakened in Hunt a desire to capture the wilderness of the Welsh mountains. This had initially been inspired by Hunt's time at the Liverpool Collegiate School, where the principal was the noted geologist and Bible scholar, Reverend William John Conybeare.

In September 1857 Hunt wrote from Snowdonia: ‘I am in the land of damp – of fog and mist… We have had nothing but rain for the last fortnight… I’ve composed my epitaph – to be graven on the biggest stone of the biggest moraine there – We’ve survived “hanging” only to come to this.’ He urged the buyer of one of the versions of Cwm Trifaen not to exhibit it: ‘It would give those fellows an excuse for mounting my picture as high as Hamon. Ruskin will see it in Durham better probably than he would in London.’ A year later his fears proved well-founded when the poor hanging of Snowdon, after an April Hailstorm and two further works by Hunt incurred the wrath of Ruskin. Snowdon, after an April Hailstorm has been identified as the undated picture exhibited at the Ashmolean Museum in 2004, The Poetry of Truth – Alfred William Hunt and the Art of Landscape Painting. However it has also been suggested that the present work may be the 1857 exhibit, as it better fits the description by John Ruskin, ‘… a very remarkable drawing, and the best study of sky that I can find this year; notable especially for its expression of the consumption of the clouds, - not their driving away, but melting away, in the warmer air.’

A Green and Pleasant Land: Two Centuries of British Landscape Painting

|
London