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Paste reproductions of St. Edward's Crown, Queen Mary's Crown and Queen Victoria's Coronation ring, 1950s
JUMP TO LOT
27
Paste reproductions of St. Edward's Crown, Queen Mary's Crown and Queen Victoria's Coronation ring, 1950s
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Jewels

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London

Paste reproductions of St. Edward's Crown, Queen Mary's Crown and Queen Victoria's Coronation ring, 1950s
Comprising: a replica of St Edward's Crown decorated with coloured pastes and imitation pearls, with purple velvet and faux ermine trim, inner circumference approximately 520mm; the replica of Queen Mary's Crown decorated with paste jewels, with purple velvet and ermine trim, inner circumference approximately 480mm; each crown with several stones deficient; the replica of Queen Victoria's coronation ring, similarly set, one stone later replaced.
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Catalogue Note

The coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place on 2ndJune 1953 at Westminster Abbey. Several replicas of the crown jewels, including St Edward's Crown, were made at the time of the Coronation to go on exhibition within the Commonwealth.

St Edward's Crown

Originally created in 1661 and later reworked, the crown is applied with four fleur-de-lys motifs and four cross pattée. Above these are two arches meeting at the centre to support a jewelled cross. In total the crown contains 444 precious and semi-precious stones and the base is trimmed with ermine fur. The crown is also seen represented on the Royal Coat of Arms for the United Kingdom.

Queen Mary's Crown

Originally commissioned by Queen Mary, from the Crown Jewellers, Garrard & Co., for the coronation of her husband George V on 22 June 1911. The crown is similarly applied with four fleur-de-lys motifs and four cross pattée. Above these are arches meeting at the centre to support a jewelled cross. Containing some 2,200 diamonds, as well as the Koh-i-Nûr, Cullinan IV and Cullinan III, the crown was described by The Daily Telegraph as having, 'no jewels but diamonds...', clustered together, 'as if they had no support but their own light.'

Queen Victoria's Coronation Ring

Originally created in 1838, by the royal goldsmiths, Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, the ring is set with an octagonal sapphire, rubies and diamonds. During the coronation ceremony the ring is placed on the fourth finger of the sovereign by the Archbishop. Unfortunately at Victoria's coronation there was a misunderstanding and Rundell, Bridge & Rundell made the ring for Queen Victoria's little finger. During the ceremony the Archbishop forced the ring onto Queen Victoria's fourth finger which meant that she had to soak her hand in ice after the ceremony to take it off.

Fine Jewels

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London